Hardware Requirements for Bitcoin Mining - The Daily Coins

A Software Engineer's Explanation of Server Ticks/FPS, the Message Pump, and Server Meshing

Since people liked my last post about the SQ42 report, I thought I would do another about the recent comment about server ticks https://robertsspaceindustries.com/spectrum/community/SC/forum/50259/thread/end-goal-server-tick-rate/2872293
To understand how this works, you must first understand the Message Pump. This is basically the heart beat of an application. It is a loop from which there is no escape, so long as the application runs. All applications have an "entry point" that initially gets called. If you've ever taken Computer Science 101, it would be your "main" function. For a console application, you enter main, it does some things, and then when it leaves main, the application closes. In an application with a graphical user interface, that loop has to regularly call a Render or Draw function that draws the UI. This happens on the Render Thread. In a regular client application your Message Pump will look something like this:
while(IsApplicationRunning) { //loop while application is meant to run HandleKeyboardInputs(); //check to see if any keyboard events have occured HandleMouseInputs(); //check to see if any mouse events have occurred, hittest children HandleSizeChanges(); //check if the window has resized, resize children to fit Render(); //recursively render all child controls } 
Each function call within the loop will call entire hierarchies of functionality. This same basic principal applies to a server as well. I am using my imagination, as I have never audited the Star Citizen codebase, but its message pump would look something like
while(IsServerOnline) { //loop while server is meant to run HandleOrbitalRotation(); //update position of all planets around the sun HandleNPCRoutines(); //update position/animations of all NPCs SynchronizePlayerLocations(); //receive player location packets and update //internal locations CheckForIssues(); //check all object positions and ensure no conflicts UpdatePlayerLocations(); //send new location data of all objects to connected //players } 
This is only the most basic sort of functionality, that doesn't factor in things like Server Object Container Streaming or Meshing or object persistence.
Each iteration of the Message Pump is a frame. These frames are calculated by having a Stopwatch and taking averages of how long it takes each frame to complete across a defined sample size. If you have a target frame rate, like 30fps for instance, subroutines can be prioritized to try to either run on the current frame, or be skipped, based on how much load is put on the servers.
My current understanding, based on Star Citizen's published material, is that there is presently one server for every 50 players, and that server handles an entire star system. Having one server for every 50 players right now is fine, and that number can hopefully be increased as optimizations happen within the code.
The important part is modifying the server code so that they can separate different Object Containers to separate physical server hardware. This would allow them to, for instance, have one server, with its own message pump, handle Port Olisar, for up to 50 players. For v0 of server meshing, I would imagine that, when the 51st player comes to PO, they would have to spin up a new server for that person of PO, and they would be on their own. When the player count goes back below 50, that server can go back to sleep and is available to be repurposed for whatever other area needs it, dynamically. As players leave PO, and go into space, each part of space could have dedicated servers for that area. The same goes for planets, or cities. Each would be its own Object Container, each Object Container could contain smaller Object Containers, so that as players move around, servers would seamlessly spin up or down to host content for the players. Technically, one server could even host multiple separate Object Containers if they both have low player counts.
This would go a very long way towards making the universe feel full and connected. To start out with, you might still only find a maximum of 50 people on Daymar, but you might also find 50 people on Yela, or ArcCorp. Each place could be full, with the game client switching servers when going to different areas. Server Object Container Streaming is what enables this. It is just a matter of handling the trade off between servers, and keeping everything synchronized. I recognize that the posts that CIG makes on the subject are often hard to understand for laymen, but these posts make me feel confident that they are making progress and heading in a meaningful direction toward the end goal of having us seamlessly switch between servers on the fly.
One thing that I have no heard anything about is the transition towards specialized physical hardware for handling some of these large-scale server-side operations. If they are using regular CPU/GPU operations, performance could be *vastly* improved by creating FPGAs or ASICs that could perform calculations with greater alacrity than a GPU could ever hope to. This is the type of hardware used in medical devices, data centers, or bitcoin mining.
I wrote this up purely to help people understand some aspects of software engineer, and no part of it is meant to be so specific that you should interpret it to be exactly how something works. I am trying to provide a high level, easy to understand, idea of some very complex concepts.
If there is any other part of development that you would like me to comment on feel free to @ me with VerdantNonsense :) Stay safe out there.
submitted by VerdantNonsense to starcitizen [link] [comments]

How are FPGAs used in trading?

A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is a chip that can be programmed to suit whatever purpose you want, as often as you want it and wherever you need it. FPGAs provide multiple advantages, including low latency, high throughput and energy efficiency.
To fully understand what FPGAs offer, imagine a performance spectrum. At one end, you have the central processing unit (CPU), which offers a generic set of instructions that can be combined to carry out an array of different tasks. This makes a CPU extremely flexible, and its behaviour can be defined through software. However, CPUs are also slow because they have to select from the available generic instructions to complete each task. In a sense, they’re a “jack of all trades, but a master of none”.
At the other end of the spectrum sit application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs). These are potentially much faster because they have been built with a single task in mind, making them a “master of one trade”. This is the kind of chip people use to mine bitcoin, for example. The downside of ASICs is that they can’t be changed, and they cost time and money to develop. FPGAs offer a perfect middle ground: they can be significantly faster than a CPU and are more flexible than ASICs.
FPGAs contain thousands, sometimes even millions, of so-called core logic blocks (CLBs). These blocks can be configured and combined to process any task that can be solved by a CPU. Compared with a CPU, FPGAs aren’t burdened by surplus hardware that would otherwise slow you down. They can therefore be used to carry out specific tasks quickly and effectively, and can even process several tasks simultaneously. These characteristics make them popular across a wide range of sectors, from aerospace to medical engineering and security systems, and of course finance.
How are FPGAs used in the financial services sector?
Speed and versatility are particularly important when buying or selling stocks and other securities. In the era of electronic trading, decisions are made in the blink of an eye. As prices change and orders come and go, companies are fed new information from exchanges and other sources via high-speed networks. This information arrives at high speeds, with time measured in nanoseconds. The sheer volume and speed of data demands a high bandwidth to process it all. Specialized trading algorithms make use of the new information in order to make trades. FPGAs provide the perfect platform to develop these applications, as they allow you to bypass non-essential software as well as generic-purpose hardware.
How do market makers use FPGAs to provide liquidity?
As a market maker, IMC provides liquidity to buyers and sellers of financial instruments. This requires us to price every instrument we trade and to react to the market accordingly. Valuation is a view on what the price of an asset should be, which is handled by our traders and our automated pricing algorithms. When a counterpart wants to buy or sell an asset on a trading venue, our role is to always be there and offer, or bid, a fair price for the asset. FPGAs enable us to perform this key function in the most efficient way possible.
At IMC, we keep a close eye on emerging technologies that can potentially improve our business. We began working with FPGAs more than a decade ago and are constantly exploring ways to develop this evolving technology. We work in a competitive industry, so our engineers have to be on their toes to make sure we’re continuously improving.
What does an FPGA engineer do?
Being an FPGA engineer is all about learning and identifying new solutions to challenges as they arise. A software developer can write code in a software language and know within seconds whether it works, and so deploy it quickly. However, the code will have to go through several abstraction layers and generic hardware components. Although you can deploy the code quickly, you do not get the fastest possible outcome.
As an FPGA engineer, it may take two to three hours of compilation time before you know whether your adjustment will result in the outcome you want. However, you can increase performance at the cost of more engineering time. The day-to-day challenge you face is how to make the process as efficient as possible with the given trade-offs while pushing the boundaries of the FPGA technology.
Skills needed to be an FPGA engineer
Things change extremely rapidly in the trading world, and agility is the name of the game. Unsurprisingly, FPGA engineers tend to enjoy a challenge. To work as an FGPA engineer at a company like IMC, you have to be a great problem-solver, a quick learner and highly adaptable.
What makes IMC a great fit for an FPGA engineer?
IMC offers a great team dynamic. We are a smaller company than many larger technology or finance houses, and we operate very much like a family unit. This means that, as a graduate engineer, you’ll never be far from the action, and you’ll be able to make an impact from day one.
Another key difference is that you’ll get to see the final outcome of your work. If you come up with an idea, we’ll give you the chance to make it work. If it does, you’ll see the results put into practice in a matter of days, which is always a great feeling. If it doesn’t, you’ll get to find out why – so there’s an opportunity to learn and improve for next time.
Ultimately, working at IMC is about having skin in the game. You’ll be entrusted with making your own decisions. And you’ll be working side by side with super smart people who are open-minded and always interested in hearing your ideas. Market making is a technology-dependent process, and we’re all in this together.
Think you have what it takes to make a difference at a technology graduate at IMC? Check out our graduate opportunities page.
submitted by IMC_Trading to u/IMC_Trading [link] [comments]

Mining for Profitability - Horizen (formerly ZenCash) Thanks Early GPU Miners

Mining for Profitability - Horizen (formerly ZenCash) Thanks Early GPU Miners
Thank you for inviting Horizen to the GPU mining AMA!
ZEN had a great run of GPU mining that lasted well over a year, and brought lots of value to the early Zclassic miners. It is mined using Equihash protocol, and there have been ASIC miners available for the algorithm since about June of 2018. GPU mining is not really profitable for Horizen at this point in time.
We’ve got a lot of miners in the Horizen community, and many GPU miners also buy ASIC miners. Happy to talk about algorithm changes, security, and any other aspect of mining in the questions below. There are also links to the Horizen website, blog post, etc. below.
So, if I’m not here to ask you to mine, hold, and love ZEN, what can I offer? Notes on some of the lessons I’ve learned about maximizing mining profitability. An update on Horizen - there is life after moving on from GPU mining. As well as answering your questions during the next 7 days.
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Mining for Profitability - Horizen (formerly ZenCash) Thanks Early GPU Miners

Author: Rolf Versluis - co-founder of Horizen

In GPU mining, just like in many of the activities involved with Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies, there is both a cycle and a progression. The Bitcoin price cycle is fairly steady, and by creating a personal handbook of actions to take during the cycle, GPU miners can maximize their profitability.
Maximizing profitability isn't the only aspect of GPU mining that is important, of course, but it is helpful to be able to invest in new hardware, and be able to have enough time to spend on building and maintaining the GPU miners. If it was a constant process that also involved losing money, then it wouldn't be as much fun.

Technology Progression

For a given mining algorithm, there is definitely a technology progression. We can look back on the technology that was used to mine Bitcoin and see how it first started off as Central Processing Unit (CPU) mining, then it moved to Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) mining, then Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and then Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC).
Throughout this evolution we have witnessed a variety of unsavory business practices that unfortunately still happen on occasion, like ASIC Miner manufacturers taking pre-orders 6 months in advance, GPU manufacturers creating commercial cards for large farms that are difficult for retail customers to secure and ASIC Miner manufacturers mining on gear for months before making it available for sale.
When a new crypto-currency is created, in many cases a new mining algorithm is created also. This is important, because if an existing algorithm was used, the coin would be open to a 51% attack from day one, and may not even be able to build a valid blockchain.
Because there's such a focus on profitable software, developers for GPU mining applications are usually able to write a mining application fairly rapidly, then iterate it to the limit of current GPU technology. If it looks like a promising new cryptocurrency, FPGA stream developers and ASIC Hardware Developers start working on their designs at the same time.
The people who create the hashing algorithms run by the miners are usually not very familiar with the design capabilities of Hardware manufacturers. Building application-specific semiconductors is an industry that's almost 60 years old now, and FPGA’s have been around for almost 35 years. This is an industry that has very experienced engineers using advanced design and modeling tools.
Promising cryptocurrencies are usually ones that are deploying new technology, or going after a big market, and who have at least a team of talented software developers. In the best case, the project has a full-stack business team involving development, project management, systems administration, marketing, sales, and leadership. This is the type of project that attracts early investment from the market, which will drive the price of the coin up significantly in the first year.
For any cryptocurrency that's a worthwhile investment of time, money, and electricity for the hashing, there will be a ASIC miners developed for it. Instead of fighting this technology progression, GPU miners may be better off recognizing it as inevitable, and taking advantage of the cryptocurrency cycle to maximize GPU mining profitability instead.

Cryptocurrency Price Cycle

For quality crypto projects, in addition to the one-way technology progression of CPU -> GPU -> FPGA -> ASIC, there is an upward price progression. More importantly, there is a cryptocurrency price cycle that oscillates around an overall upgrade price progression. Plotted against time, a cycle with an upward progressions looks like a sine wave with an ever increasing average value, which is what we see so far with the Bitcoin price.

Cryptocurrency price cycle and progression for miners
This means mining promising new cryptocurrencies with GPU miners, holding them as the price rises, and being ready to sell a significant portion in the first year. Just about every cryptocurrency is going to have a sharp price rise at some point, whether through institutional investor interest or by being the target of a pump-and-dump operation. It’s especially likely in the first year, while the supply is low and there is not much trading volume or liquidity on exchanges.
Miners need to operate in the world of government money, as well as cryptocurrency. The people who run mining businesses at some point have to start selling their mining proceeds to pay the bills, and to buy new equipment as the existing equipment becomes obsolete. Working to maximize profitability means more than just mining new cryptocurrencies, it also means learning when to sell and how to manage money.

Managing Cash for Miners

The worst thing that can happen to a business is to run out of cash. When that happens, the business usually shuts down and goes into bankruptcy. Sometimes an investor comes in and picks up the pieces, but at the point the former owners become employees.
There are two sides to managing cash - one is earning it, the other is spending it, and the cryptocurrency price cycle can tell the GPU miner when it is the best time to do certain things. A market top and bottom is easy to recognize in hindsight, and harder to see when in the middle of it. Even if a miner is able to recognize the tops and bottoms, it is difficult to act when there is so much hype and positivity at the top of the cycle, and so much gloom and doom at the bottom.
A decent rule of thumb for the last few cycles appears to be that at the top and bottom of the cycle BTC is 10x as expensive compared to USD as the last cycle. Newer crypto projects tend to have bigger price swings than Bitcoin, and during the rising of the pricing cycle there is the possibility that an altcoin will have a rise to 100x its starting price.
Taking profits from selling altcoins during the rise is important, but so is maintaining a reserve. In order to catch a 100x move, it may be worth the risk to put some of the altcoin on an exchange and set a very high limit order. For the larger cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin it is important to set trailing sell stops on the way up, and to not buy back in for at least a month if a sell stop gets triggered. Being able to read price charts, see support and resistance areas for price, and knowing how to set sell orders are an important part of mining profitability.

Actions to Take During the Cycle

As the cycle starts to rise from the bottom, this is a good time to buy mining hardware - it will be inexpensive. Also to mine and buy altcoins, which are usually the first to see a price rise, and will have larger price increases than Bitcoin.
On the rise of the cycle, this is a good time to see which altcoins are doing well from a project fundamentals standpoint, and which ones look like they are undergoing accumulation from investors.
Halfway through the rise of the cycle is the time to start selling altcoins for the larger project cryptos like Bitcoin. Miners will miss some of the profit at the top of the cycle, but will not run out of cash by doing this. This is also the time to stop buying mining hardware. Don’t worry, you’ll be able to pick up that same hardware used for a fraction of the price at the next bottom.
As the price nears the top of the cycle, sell enough Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies to meet the following projected costs:
  • Mining electricity costs for the next 12 months
  • Planned investment into new miners for the next cycle
  • Additional funds needed for things like supporting a family or buying a Lambo
  • Taxes on all the capital gains from the sale of cryptocurrencies
It may be worth selling 70-90% of crypto holdings, maintaining a reserve in case there is second upward move caused by government bankruptcies. But selling a large part of the crypto is helpful to maintaining profitability and having enough cash reserves to make it through the bottom part of the next cycle.
As the cycle has peaked and starts to decline, this is a good time to start investing in mining facilities and other infrastructure, brush up on trading skills, count your winnings, and take some vacation.
At the bottom of the cycle, it is time to start buying both used and new mining equipment. The bottom can be hard to recognize.
If you can continue to mine all the way through bottom part of the cryptocurrency pricing cycle, paying with the funds sold near the top, you will have a profitable and enjoyable cryptocurrency mining business. Any cryptocurrency you are able to hold onto will benefit from the price progression in the next higher cycle phase.

An Update on Horizen - formerly ZenCash

The team at Horizen recognizes the important part that GPU miners played in the early success of Zclassic and ZenCash, and there is always a welcoming attitude to any of ZEN miners, past and present. About 1 year after ZenCash launched, ASIC miners became available for the Equihash algorithm. Looking at a chart of mining difficulty over time shows when it was time for GPU miners to move to mining other cryptocurrencies.

Horizen Historical Block Difficulty Graph
Looking at the hashrate chart, it is straightforward to see that ASIC miners were deployed starting June 2018. It appears that there was a jump in mining hashrate in October of 2017. This may have been larger GPU farms switching over to mine Horizen, FPGA’s on the network, or early version of Equihash ASIC miners that were kept private.
The team understands the importance of the cryptocurrency price cycle as it affects the funds from the Horizen treasury and the investments that can be made. 20% of each block mined is sent to the Horizen non-profit foundation for use to improve the project. Just like miners have to manage money, the team has to decide whether to spend funds when the price is high or convert it to another form in preparation for the bottom part of the cycle.
During the rise and upper part of the last price cycle Horizen was working hard to maximize the value of the project through many different ways, including spending on research and development, project management, marketing, business development with exchanges and merchants, and working to create adoption in all the countries of the world.
During the lower half of the cycle Horizen has reduced the team to the essentials, and worked to build a base of users, relationships with investors, exchanges, and merchants, and continue to develop the higher priority software projects. Lower priority software development, going to trade shows, and paying for business partnerships like exchanges and applications have all been completely stopped.
Miners are still a very important part of the Horizen ecosystem, earning 60% of the block reward. 20% goes to node operators, with 20% to the foundation. In the summer of 2018 the consensus algorithm was modified slightly to make it much more difficult for any group of miners to perform a 51% attack on Horizen. This has so far proven effective.
The team is strong, we provide monthly updates on a YouTube live stream on the first Wednesday of each month where all questions asked during the stream are addressed, and our marketing team works to develop awareness of Horizen worldwide. New wallet software was released recently, and it is the foundation application for people to use and manage their ZEN going forward.
Horizen is a Proof of Work cryptocurrency, and there is no plan to change that by the current development team. If there is a security or centralization concern, there may be change to the algorithm, but that appears unlikely at this time, as the hidden chain mining penalty looks like it is effective in stopping 51% attacks.
During 2019 and 2020 the Horizen team plans to release many new software updates:
  • Sidechains modification to main software
  • Sidechain Software Development Kit
  • Governance and Treasury application running on a sidechain
  • Node tracking and payments running on a sidechain
  • Conversion from blockchain to a Proof of Work BlockDAG using Equihash mining algorithm
After these updates are working well, the team will work to transition Horizen over to a governance model where major decisions and the allocation of treasury funds are done through a form of democratic voting. At this point all the software developed by Horizen is expected to be open source.
When the governance is transitioned, the project should be as decentralized as possible. The goal of decentralization is to enable resilience and preventing the capture of the project by regulators, government, criminal organizations, large corporations, or a small group of individuals.
Everyone involved with Horizen can be proud of what we have accomplished together so far. Miners who were there for the early mining and growth of the project played a large part in securing the network, evangelizing to new community members, and helping to create liquidity on new exchanges. Miners are still a very important part of the project and community. Together we can look forward to achieving many new goals in the future.

Here are some links to find out more about Horizen.
Horizen Website – https://horizen.global
Horizen Blog – https://blog.horizen.global
Horizen Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/Horizen/
Horizen Discord – https://discord.gg/SuaMBTb
Horizen Github – https://github.com/ZencashOfficial
Horizen Forum – https://forum.horizen.global/
Horizen Twitter – https://twitter.com/horizenglobal
Horizen Telegram – https://t.me/horizencommunity
Horizen on Bitcointalk – https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2047435.0
Horizen YouTube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/c/Horizen/
Buy or Sell Horizen
Horizen on CoinMarketCap – https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/zencash/

About the Author:

Rolf Versluis is Co-Founder and Executive Advisor of the privacy oriented cryptocurrency Horizen. He also operates multiple private cryptocurrency mining facilities with hundreds of operational systems, and has a blog and YouTube channel on crypto mining called Block Operations.
Rolf applies his engineering background as well as management and leadership experience from running a 60 person IT company in Atlanta and as a US Navy nuclear submarine officer operating out of Hawaii to help grow and improve the businesses in which he is involved.
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Thank you again for the Ask Me Anything - please do. I'll be checking the post and answering questions actively from 28 Feb to 6 Mar 2019 - Rolf
submitted by Blockops to gpumining [link] [comments]

Technical Cryptonight Discussion: What about low-latency RAM (RLDRAM 3, QDR-IV, or HMC) + ASICs?

The Cryptonight algorithm is described as ASIC resistant, in particular because of one feature:
A megabyte of internal memory is almost unacceptable for the modern ASICs. 
EDIT: Each instance of Cryptonight requires 2MB of RAM. Therefore, any Cryptonight multi-processor is required to have 2MB per instance. Since CPUs are incredibly well loaded with RAM (ie: 32MB L3 on Threadripper, 16 L3 on Ryzen, and plenty of L2+L3 on Skylake Servers), it seems unlikely that ASICs would be able to compete well vs CPUs.
In fact, a large number of people seem to be incredibly confident in Cryptonight's ASIC resistance. And indeed, anyone who knows how standard DDR4 works knows that DDR4 is unacceptable for Cryptonight. GDDR5 similarly doesn't look like a very good technology for Cryptonight, focusing on high-bandwidth instead of latency.
Which suggests only an ASIC RAM would be able to handle the 2MB that Cryptonight uses. Solid argument, but it seems to be missing a critical point of analysis from my eyes.
What about "exotic" RAM, like RLDRAM3 ?? Or even QDR-IV?

QDR-IV SRAM

QDR-IV SRAM is absurdly expensive. However, its a good example of "exotic RAM" that is available on the marketplace. I'm focusing on it however because QDR-IV is really simple to describe.
QDR-IV costs roughly $290 for 16Mbit x 18 bits. It is true Static-RAM. 18-bits are for 8-bits per byte + 1 parity bit, because QDR-IV is usually designed for high-speed routers.
QDR-IV has none of the speed or latency issues with DDR4 RAM. There are no "banks", there are no "refreshes", there are no "obliterate the data as you load into sense amplifiers". There's no "auto-charge" as you load the data from the sense-amps back into the capacitors.
Anything that could have caused latency issues is gone. QDR-IV is about as fast as you can get latency-wise. Every clock cycle, you specify an address, and QDR-IV will generate a response every clock cycle. In fact, QDR means "quad data rate" as the SRAM generates 2-reads and 2-writes per clock cycle. There is a slight amount of latency: 8-clock cycles for reads (7.5nanoseconds), and 5-clock cycles for writes (4.6nanoseconds). For those keeping track at home: AMD Zen's L3 cache has a latency of 40 clocks: aka 10nanoseconds at 4GHz
Basically, QDR-IV BEATS the L3 latency of modern CPUs. And we haven't even begun to talk software or ASIC optimizations yet.

CPU inefficiencies for Cryptonight

Now, if that weren't bad enough... CPUs have a few problems with the Cryptonight algorithm.
  1. AMD Zen and Intel Skylake CPUs transfer from L3 -> L2 -> L1 cache. Each of these transfers are in 64-byte chunks. Cryptonight only uses 16 of these bytes. This means that 75% of L3 cache bandwidth is wasted on 48-bytes that would never be used per inner-loop of Cryptonight. An ASIC would transfer only 16-bytes at a time, instantly increasing the RAM's speed by 4-fold.
  2. AES-NI instructions on Ryzen / Threadripper can only be done one-per-core. This means a 16-core Threadripper can at most perform 16 AES encryptions per clock tick. An ASIC can perform as many as you'd like, up to the speed of the RAM.
  3. CPUs waste a ton of energy: there's L1 and L2 caches which do NOTHING in Cryptonight. There are floating-point units, memory controllers, and more. An ASIC which strips things out to only the bare necessities (basically: AES for Cryptonight core) would be way more power efficient, even at ancient 65nm or 90nm designs.

Ideal RAM access pattern

For all yall who are used to DDR4, here's a special trick with QDR-IV or RLDRAM. You can pipeline accesses in QDR-IV or RLDRAM. What does this mean?
First, it should be noted that Cryptonight has the following RAM access pattern:
QDR-IV and RLDRAM3 still have latency involved. Assuming 8-clocks of latency, the naive access pattern would be:
  1. Read
  2. Stall
  3. Stall
  4. Stall
  5. Stall
  6. Stall
  7. Stall
  8. Stall
  9. Stall
  10. Write
  11. Stall
  12. Stall
  13. Stall
  14. Stall
  15. Stall
  16. Stall
  17. Stall
  18. Stall
  19. Read #2
  20. Stall
  21. Stall
  22. Stall
  23. Stall
  24. Stall
  25. Stall
  26. Stall
  27. Stall
  28. Write #2
  29. Stall
  30. Stall
  31. Stall
  32. Stall
  33. Stall
  34. Stall
  35. Stall
  36. Stall
This isn't very efficient: the RAM sits around waiting. Even with "latency reduced" RAM, you can see that the RAM still isn't doing very much. In fact, this is why people thought Cryptonight was safe against ASICs.
But what if we instead ran four instances in parallel? That way, there is always data flowing.
  1. Cryptonight #1 Read
  2. Cryptonight #2 Read
  3. Cryptonight #3 Read
  4. Cryptonight #4 Read
  5. Stall
  6. Stall
  7. Stall
  8. Stall
  9. Stall
  10. Cryptonight #1 Write
  11. Cryptonight #2 Write
  12. Cryptonight #3 Write
  13. Cryptonight #4 Write
  14. Stall
  15. Stall
  16. Stall
  17. Stall
  18. Stall
  19. Cryptonight #1 Read #2
  20. Cryptonight #2 Read #2
  21. Cryptonight #3 Read #2
  22. Cryptonight #4 Read #2
  23. Stall
  24. Stall
  25. Stall
  26. Stall
  27. Stall
  28. Cryptonight #1 Write #2
  29. Cryptonight #2 Write #2
  30. Cryptonight #3 Write #2
  31. Cryptonight #4 Write #2
  32. Stall
  33. Stall
  34. Stall
  35. Stall
  36. Stall
Notice: we're doing 4x the Cryptonight in the same amount of time. Now imagine if the stalls were COMPLETELY gone. DDR4 CANNOT do this. And that's why most people thought ASICs were impossible for Cryptonight.
Unfortunately, RLDRAM3 and QDR-IV can accomplish this kind of pipelining. In fact, that's what they were designed for.

RLDRAM3

As good as QDR-IV RAM is, its way too expensive. RLDRAM3 is almost as fast, but is way more complicated to use and describe. Due to the lower cost of RLDRAM3 however, I'd assume any ASIC for CryptoNight would use RLDRAM3 instead of the simpler QDR-IV. RLDRAM3 32Mbit x36 bits costs $180 at quantities == 1, and would support up to 64-Parallel Cryptonight instances (In contrast, a $800 AMD 1950x Threadripper supports 16 at the best).
Such a design would basically operate at the maximum speed of RLDRAM3. In the case of x36-bit bus and 2133MT/s, we're talking about 2133 / (Burst Length4 x 4 read/writes x 524288 inner loop) == 254 Full Cryptonight Hashes per Second.
254 Hashes per second sounds low, and it is. But we're talking about literally a two-chip design here. 1-chip for RAM, 1-chip for the ASIC/AES stuff. Such a design would consume no more than 5 Watts.
If you were to replicate the ~5W design 60-times, you'd get 15240 Hash/second at 300 Watts.

RLDRAM2

Depending on cost calculations, going cheaper and "making more" might be a better idea. RLDRAM2 is widely available at only $32 per chip at 800 MT/s.
Such a design would theoretically support 800 / 4x4x524288 == 95 Cryptonight Hashes per second.
The scary part: The RLDRAM2 chip there only uses 1W of power. Together, you get 5 Watts again as a reasonable power-estimate. x60 would be 5700 Hashes/second at 300 Watts.
Here's Micron's whitepaper on RLDRAM2: https://www.micron.com/~/media/documents/products/technical-note/dram/tn4902.pdf . RLDRAM3 is the same but denser, faster, and more power efficient.

Hybrid Cube Memory

Hybrid Cube Memory is "stacked RAM" designed for low latency. As far as I can tell, Hybrid Cube memory allows an insane amount of parallelism and pipelining. It'd be the future of an ASIC Cryptonight design. The existence of Hybrid Cube Memory is more about "Generation 2" or later. In effect, it demonstrates that future designs can be lower-power and give higher-speed.

Realistic ASIC Sketch: RLDRAM3 + Parallel Processing

The overall board design would be the ASIC, which would be a simple pipelined AES ASIC that talks with RLDRAM3 ($180) or RLDRAM2 ($30).
Its hard for me to estimate an ASIC's cost without the right tools or design. But a multi-project wafer like MOSIS offers "cheap" access to 14nm and 22nm nodes. Rumor is that this is roughly $100k per run for ~40 dies, suitable for research-and-development. Mass production would require further investments, but mass production at the ~65nm node is rumored to be in the single-digit $$millions or maybe even just 6-figures or so.
So realistically speaking: it'd take ~$10 Million investment + a talented engineer (or team of engineers) who are familiar with RLDRAM3, PCIe 3.0, ASIC design, AES, and Cryptonight to build an ASIC.

TL;DR:

submitted by dragontamer5788 to Monero [link] [comments]

Waltonchain All-in-One - Extended

Welcome!

I would like to warmly welcome everyone to waltonchain
This is an updated, extended community-written post and I will try to update it regularly over time.
Please respect our rules (see sidebar) and feel free to comment, contribute and ask questions.
Don’t forget to subscribe to the subreddit for any news on Waltonchain!
 

Getting Started

What is Waltonchain?

The Waltonchain Foundation is building a cross-industry, cross-data sharing platform by integrating Blockchain with the Internet of Things through self-developed RFID Chips with intellectual property rights.
The in-house developed Waltonchain RFID chips integrate a proprietary, genuine random number generator and an asymmetric encryption logic and hardware signature circuit, all of which are patent-protected.
The combination of self-developed RFID chips and the Waltonchain blockchain will ultimately achieve the interconnection of all things and create a genuine, believable, traceable businessmodel with totally shared data and transparent information.
Waltonchain will unfold a new era of the Value Internet of Things (VIoT).
 
Waltonchain Introduction Video
Launch of Waltonchain
 

The Project

The Waltonchain team has formulated a 4-phase development plan, starting from infrastructure platform establishment to gradually incorporating retail, logistics and product manufacturing, and to finally achieving the full coverage of the business ecosystem.
 
As for the phase 1.0 of the project, the team has developed the clothing system integration scheme based on RFID. The application scenarios at phase 1.0 will establish Golden demonstration template
At phase 2.0, our RFID beacon chip will be massproduced and can be used in clothing, B2C retail and logistics.
At phase 3.0, manufacturers will achieve traceable customization of intelligent packaging.
At the project phase 4.0, with the upgrading and iteration of assets information collection hardware and improvement of blockchain data structure, all assets can be registered in Waltonchain in the future.
 
Original Roadmap Thread

Project-Updates:

Video: WTC-Garment System by Waltonchain & Kaltendin
Video: WTC-Food System by Waltonchain
 

Official Resources

Waltonchain Whitepaper
Waltonchain Official Website
Waltonchain Github
 
Official Official Medium
Official Slack
Official Instagram
Official Facebook
Official Twitter @waltonchain
Official Telegram @waltonchain_en
 
Dedicated community Telegram channel for Waltonchain miners, MN & GMN holders.
@WaltonchainMining
 
 
Chinese Community
本群为沃尔顿链华文官方社群
Chinese Telegram @waltonchain_cn
官方网站 - Waltonchain China - Website
 
Korean Community
공식사이트 - Waltonchain Korea - Website
카카오톡 - Waltonchain Korea - Kakao
트위터 - Waltonchain Korea - Twitter
블로그 - Waltonchain Korea - Naver Blog
인스타그램 - Waltonchain Korea - Instagram
Freyr 공식텔레그램방(한국) - Freyrchain Korea - Telegram
Communities in Progress
Russian Twitter @waltonchain_ru
Russian Website
Japanese Twitter @waltonchain_jp
Japanese Website
Brazilian Twitter @waltonchain_br
 

Waltonchain Wallet

Please note that before the token swap,
DO NOT transfer your ERC20 WTC tokens to the WTC wallet!!
 
Wallet for PC (Github)
Web Wallet - Instruction Manual
Windows Wallet - User Manual
Windows Wallet - Tutorial Video
Wallet for Android
Google Playstore
Github
Android User Manual
Android Wallet - Tutorial Video
 
Wallet for IOS
(pending Apple Store approval)
 
Explorer
Waltonchain Explorer
Waltonchain Blockchain Explorer User Manual
 
Mining
Waltonchain GPU Mining User Manual
Waltonchain Progressive Mining Reward Program
 
Unofficial
Unofficial Guardian Masternode Tracker
waltonchain.tech - Unofficial collection of news and useful resources

The Foundation

>> Waltonchain Organizational Chart <<<--
 
Waltonchain Foundation Ltd. (Singapore) - 沃尔顿链
Waltonchain (HK) Development Co. Ltd. (Head company)
Walton Chain Technology Co. Ltd. (Korea)
Silicon (Shenzhen) Electronic Technology Co. Ltd.
Silicon (Xiamen) Electronic Technology Co.Ltd. (RFID Chip Research)
Silicon (Quanzhou) Electronic Technology Co. Ltd.(IoT Intelligent Switch Chip)
Nanjing Sleewa Information Technology Co. Ltd. (Blockchain)
Quanzhou KEDIHENG Electronic Technology Co. Ltd
Xiamen IOT Technology Co. Ltd.
Xiamen Citylink Technology Co.Ltd.
Xiamen ZhongChuan IOT Industry Research Institute Co.Ltd.
 

The Team

Founder:

Do Sanghyuk (都相爀) – Initiator in Korea
Korean, Vice Chairman of the China - Korea Cultural Exchange Development Committee, Director of the Korea Standard Products Association, Chairman of Seongnam Branch of the Korea Small and Medium Enterprises Committee, Chairman of Korea NC Technology Co., Ltd., Senior Reporter of IT TODAY News, Senior Reporter of NEWS PAPER Economic Department, Director of ET NEWS.
 
Xu Fangcheng (许芳呈) – Initiator in China
Chinese, majored in Business Management, former Director for Supply Chain Management of Septwolves Group Ltd., has rich practical experience in supply chain management and purchasing process management. Currently, he is the Director of Shenzhen Silicon, the Director of Xiamen Silicon and the Board Chairman of Quanzhou Silicon. He is also one of our Angel investors.
 

Senior Experts:

Kim Suk ki (金锡基)
Korean, South Koreas electronics industry leader, Doctor of Engineering (graduated from the University of Minnesota), Professor of Korea University, previously worked at Bell Labs and Honeywell USA, served as vice president of Samsung Electronics, senior expert in integrated circuit design field, IEEE Senior Member, Vice President of the Korea Institute of Electrical Engineers, Chairman of the Korea Semiconductor Industry Association. Has published more than 250 academic papers with more than 60 patents.
 
Zhu Yanping (朱延平)
Taiwanese, China, Doctor of Engineering (graduated from National Cheng Kung University), Chairman of the Taiwan Cloud Services Association, Director of Information Management Department of National Chung Hsing University. Has won the Youth Invention Award by Taiwan Ministry of Education and Taiwan Top Ten Information Talent Award. Has deeply studied blockchain applications over the years and led a block chain technology team to develop systems for health big data and agricultural traceability projects.
 

Chief Experts

Mo Bing (莫冰)
Chinese, Doctor of Engineering (graduated from Harbin Institute of Technology), Research Professor of Korea University, Distinguished Fellow of Sun Yat - sen University, Internet of Things expert, integrated circuit expert, Senior Member of Chinese Society of Micro-Nano Technology, IEEE Member. Has published more than 20 papers and applied for 18 invention patents. Began his research of BitCoin in 2013, one of the earliest users of btc 38.com and Korea korbit. Served as Technical Director of Korea University to cooperate with Samsung Group to complete the project Multi sensor data interaction and fusion based on peer to peer network. Committed to the integration of block chain technology and Internet of Things to create a real commercialized public chain.
 
Wei Songjie (魏松杰)
Chinese, Doctor of Engineering (graduated from the University of Delaware), Associate Professor of Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Core Member and Master Supervisor of Network Space Security Engineering Research Institute, Block Chain Technology expert in the field of computer network protocol and application, network and information security. Has published more than 20 papers and applied for 7 invention patents. Previously worked at Google, Qualcomm, Bloomberg and many other high-tech companies in the United States, served as R D engineer and technical expert; has a wealth of experience in computer system design, product development and project management.
 

Core Members

Shan Liang (单良)
Graduated from KOREATECH (Korea University of Technology and Education) Mechanical Engineering Department, Venture Capital PhD, GM of Waltonchain Technology Co., Ltd. (Korea), Director of Korea Sungkyun Technology Co., Ltd., Chinese Market Manager of the heating component manufacturer NHTECH, a subsidiary of Samsung SDI, economic group leader of the Friendship Association of Chinese Doctoral Students in Korea, one of the earliest users of Korbit, senior digital money player.
 
Chen Zhangrong (陈樟荣)
Chinese, graduated in Business Management, received a BBA degree in Armstrong University in the United States, President of TIANYU INTERNATIONAL GROUP LIMITED, leader of Chinese clothing accessories industry, Chinas well-known business mentor, guest of the CCTV2 Win in China show in 2008. Researcher in the field of thinking training for Practical Business Intelligence e-commerce and MONEYYOU course, expert on success for Profit Model course. Began to contact Bitcoin in 2013 with a strong interest and in-depth study of digital money and decentralized management thinking. Has a wealth of practical experience in the business management, market research, channel construction, business cooperation and business model.
 
Lin Herui (林和瑞)
Chinese, Dean of Xiamen Zhongchuan Internet of Things Industry Research Institute, Chairman of Xiamen Citylink Technology Co., Ltd., Chairman of Xiamen IOT. He successively served as Nokia RD Manager and Product Manager, Microsoft Hardware Department Supply Chain Director. In 2014, started to set up a number of IoT enterprises and laid out the industrial chain of the Internet of Things. The products and services developed under his guidance are very popular. Assisted the government in carrying out industrial and policy research and participated in planning of multiple government projects of smart cities, IoT towns and project reviews.
 
Ma Xingyi (马兴毅)
Chinese, China Scholarship Council (CSC) special student, Doctor of Engineering of Korea University, Research Professor of Fusion Chemical Systems Institute of Korea University, Korea Sungkyun Technology Co., Ltd. CEO, Member of Korea Industry Association, Associate Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry, has published his research results in the worlds top journal Nature Communications and participated in the preparation of a series of teaching materials for Internet of Things engineering titled Introduction to the Internet of Things. His current research direction covers cross-disciplines that combine blockchain technology with intelligent medical technology.
 
Zhao Haiming (赵海明)
Chinese, Doctor of Chemical Conductive Polymer of Sungkyunkwan University, core member of Korea BK21th conductive polymer project, researcher of Korea Gyeonggi Institute of Sensor, researcher of Korea ECO NCTech Co., Ltd., Vice President of the Chinese Chamber of Commerce, Director of Korea Sungkyun Technology Co., Ltd. He has been engaged in transfer of semiconductor, sensor and other technologies in South Korea. He is an early participant of the digital currency market.
 
Liu Cai (刘才)
Chinese, Master of Engineering, has 12 years of experience in design and verification of VLSI and a wealth of practical project experience in RFID chip design process, SOC chip architecture, digital-analog hybrid circuit design, including algorithm design, RTL design, simulation verification, FPGA prototype verification, DC synthesis, backend PR, package testing, etc. Has led a team to complete the development of a variety of navigation and positioning baseband chips and communication baseband chips, finished a series of AES, DES and other encryption module designs, won the first prize of GNSS and LBS Association of China for scientific and technological progress. Finally, he is an expert in the consensus mechanism principle of blockchain and the related asymmetric encryption algorithm.
 
Yang Feng (杨锋)
Chinese, Master of Engineering, worked at ZTE. Artificial intelligence expert, integrated circuit expert. Has 12 years of experience in VLSI research and development, architecture design and verification and 5 years of research experience in artificial intelligence and the genetic algorithm. Has won the Shenzhen Science and Technology Innovation Award. Has done an in-depth research on the principle and realization of the RFID technology, the underlying infrastructure of blockchain, smart contracts and the consensus mechanism algorithm.
 
Guo Jianping (郭建平)
Chinese, Doctor of Engineering (graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong), Associate Professor of the Hundred Talents Program of Sun Yat-sen University, academic advisor of masters degree students, IEEE senior member, integrated circuit expert. Has published more than 40 international journal conference papers in the field of IC design and applied for 16 patents in China.
 
Huang Ruimin (黄锐敏)
Chinese, Doctor of Engineering (graduated from the University of Freiburg, Germany), academic advisor of masters degree students, lecturer of the Department of Electronics of Huaqiao University, integrated circuit expert. Mainly explores digital signal processing circuit and system implementation and works on digital signal processing technology long-term research and development.
 
Guo Rongxin (郭荣新)
Chinese, Master of Engineering, Deputy Director of the Communication Technology Research Center of Huaqiao University. Has more than 10 years of experience in design and development of hardware and software for embedded systems, works on the long-term research and development of RFID and blockchain technology in the field of Internet of Things.
 
Dai Minhua (戴闽华)
Chinese, graduated in Business Management, received a BBA degree from Armstrong University, senior financial expert, served as Vice President and CFO of Tanyu International Group Co., Ltd. Has 13 years of financial work experience, has a wealth of experience in developing and implementing enterprise strategy and business plans, as well as achieving business management objectives and development goals.
 
Liu Dongxin (刘东欣)
Chinese, received an MBA from China Europe International Business School, Visiting Scholar of Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, strategic management consulting expert, investment and financing expert. His current research interest lies in the impact of the blockchain technology on the financial sector.
 

Angel Investors

Song Guoping (宋国平)
Qiu Jun (邱俊)
Yan Xiaoqian (严小铅)
Lin Jingwei (林敬伟)
He Honglian (何红连)

Advisory Team

Ko Sang Tae (高尚台)
Liu Xiaowei (刘晓为)
Su Yan (苏岩)
Zhang Yan (张岩)
Ma Pingping (马萍萍)
Peng Xiande (彭先德)
Fu Ke (傅克)
Xiao Guangjian (肖光坚)
Li Xiong (李雄)
 
The Team (pt.I)
The Team - The Engineers (pt. II)
The Team - Angel Investors & Advisors (pt. III)
WaltonChain Office Tour
Meet the team #1: Xu Fangcheng
Meet the team #2: South Korean Team
Meet the team #3: Wei Songjie
Meet the team #4: Suk Ki Kim
Meet the team #5: Lin Herui
Meet the team #6: Bing Mok (CEO)
 

Partnerships, Affiliations & Corporate Interests

Government Affiliations
Fujian IoT Industry Association
Air purification and smart monitoring project with Jinhu Provincial Government
"Smart Oceans" blockchain R&D project with Fujian Provincial Government
Building "Blockchain Silicon Valley" with Taiwan Cloud and Fujian Provincial Government
KISA and Korean IoT research centre
Taiwan Cloud Association
Korea University engineering department
Korea Blockchain Enterprise Promotion Association (authorized by South Korean National Assembly)
 
Smart Logistics / Smart Warehouse
Xiangyu Group
Fuyao Glass Industry Group co., Ltd
Kehua
Lipson Plastic
NanKang City Furniture industry
Direct delivery
Fujian Soonbox Logistics Park
Huodull Technology
 
Smart Retail
Guangdong Original Clothing Trading Center
Shenzhen M&A Association of Listed Companies
Septwolves
Fuguiniao
SMEN
TANYU
JoeOne
Lalabobo
Ishijah
Kaltendin
 
Technical Alliance
Alibaba Cloud
China Mobile IoT Alliance
Xiamen Branch of China Telecom Corporation Limited
Zhangzhou Branch of** China Telecom** Corporation Limited
NC Technologies
Shenzhen Card Cube Smart Technology co., Ltd
NIDS Sensor Technology
Sungkyun Technologies
NH Tech
Jiangsu Zhongke Internet of Things Technology Venture Capital Co., Ltd.
Fujian C-TOP Electronics co., Ltd.
 
Finance
Sinolink Securites
Gingko Capital (Investment Arm of Waltonchain) -> Investments
Gingko Investment List on Reddit
 
Blockchain Partner
Mobius
Freyrchain
Loci
Coinlink
SwftCoin
Morganchain
Aston
 
Media Partner
JU&KE Creative Design
Yunnan Yunshanghuaxia Trading co., Ltd.
ArtCrypto
Fanfangxiang Culture & Media co., Ltd.
 
Waltonchain Government Affiliations Infographic
Waltonchain Business Affiliations Infographic
Summary of Some of Waltonchain's Government and Business Partnerships
 
Child Chains
Freyrchain - Freyrchain - The world’s first blockchain-based collectibles data authenticity platform
Fashionchain Fashionchain - Fashionchain restructures the strongly-centralized pyramid structure inherent in the fashion industry ecology into a decentralized structure in which all parties connect point to point directly.
 
Click here for the News, PR & Awards Thread.
Click here for a Timeline of Official - Waltonchain-Medium - Posts.
 
Videos
Waltonchain Annual Meeting Presentation Video
Waltonchain Introduction Video
Waltonchain Visit and Product Demo! (Part 1 of 2) - Boxmining
Waltonchain Interview and Demo (Part 2 of 2) - Boxmining
Waltonchain Coinnest Meetup with Mo Bing
Dr. Mo Bing's First Live Interview with Coinnest CEO
Waltonchain CEO Mo Bing announcing the official launch of Waltonchain Mainnet
List of AMAs
First Reddit AMA - October 1, 2017
Technical AMA - October 9, 2017
Hardware AMA Summary - October 17,2017
Extended Hardware AMA - October 24, 2017
Retail Demo AMA - November 27, 2017
Masternode AMA - December 7, 2017
Slack AMA Live Thread - January 3, 2018
Waltonchain Beta Release AMA Part 1 - January 5, 2018
Waltonchain Beta Release AMA Part 2 - January 15, 2018
Waltonchain February Q&A - February 18, 2018
Waltonchain March AMA Part 1 - March 19, 2018
Waltonchain March AMA Part 2 - March 27, 2018
Progress Reports
Waltonchain Work Progress in Q2 2018
Waltonchain Work Progress in Q1 2018
Waltonchain: New Logo · New IC strategy ·New Journey!
The Summary of Waltonchain in 2017
Waltonchain Project Progress Report (Nov. – Dec. 2017)
Professor Kim Suk Ki Arrived at Xiamen for Project Review and to Provide Guidance
A letter to the waltonchain family
A Letter from Waltonchain Foundation
Waltonchain Alpha Version Internal Testing
Noteworthy Posts
Waltonchain’s Bigger Picture: OBOR
Waltonchain: Ushering an Era of IoT Mass Market Adoption
What is Waltonchain and Why Should We Care?
Waltonchain and the Chinese Government: Cooperation, Collaboration and a Bright Future
Top 5 Cryptocurrencies Set For Success In 2018 - Invest in Blockchain
 
Exchanges
Binance, Coinnest, HitBTC, LATOKEN, OKEx, Kucoin, COSS, Coinlink, Allcoin, Coinrail, Cobinhood, Huobi
 

Frequently Asked Questions

 
 
Walton Knights
u/fent11
u/NetworkTraveler
u/yayowam
u/Crypto_RALLY
u/TheSideQuest
RikkiTikki (slack)
Crypto Buff (telegram)
submitted by istaan69 to waltonchain [link] [comments]

Best $100-$300 FPGA development board in 2018?

Hello, I’ve been trying to decide on a FPGA development board, and have only been able to find posts and Reddit threads from 4-5 years ago. So I wanted to start a new thread and ask about the best “mid-range” FGPA development board in 2018. (Price range $100-$300.)
I started with this Quora answer about FPGA boards, from 2013. The Altera DE1 sounded good. Then I looked through the Terasic DE boards.
Then I found this Reddit thread from 2014, asking about the DE1-SoC vs the Cyclone V GX Starter Kit: https://www.reddit.com/FPGA/comments/1xsk6w/cyclone_v_gx_starter_kit_vs_de1soc_board/‬ (I was also leaning towards the DE1-SoC.)
Anyway, I thought I better ask here, because there are probably some new things to be aware of in 2018.
I’m completely new to FPGAs and VHDL, but I have experience with electronics/microcontrollers/programming. My goal is to start with some basic soft-core processors. I want to get some C / Rust programs compiling and running on my own CPU designs. I also want to play around with different instruction sets, and maybe start experimenting with asynchronous circuits (e.g. clock-less CPUs)
Also I don’t know if this is possible, but I’d like to experiment with ternary computing, or work with analog signals instead of purely digital logic. EDIT: I just realized that you would call those FPAAs, i.e. “analog” instead of “gate”. Would be cool if there was a dev board that also had an FPAA, but no problem if not.
EDIT 2: I also realized why "analog signals on an FPGA" doesn't make any sense, because of how LUTs work. They emulate boolean logic with a lookup table, and the table can only store 0s and 1s. So there's no way to emulate a transistor in an intermediate state. I'll just have play around with some transistors on a breadboard.
UPDATE: I've put together a table with some of the best options:
Board Maker Chip LUTs Price SoC? Features
icoBoard Lattice iCE40-HX8K 7,680 $100 Sort of A very simple FPGA development board that plugs into a Raspberry Pi, so you have a "backup" hard-core CPU that can control networking, etc. Supports a huge range of pmod accessories. You can write a program/circuit so that the Raspberry Pi CPU and the FPGA work together, similar to a SoC. Proprietary bitstream is fully reverse engineered and supported by Project IceStorm, and there is an open-source toolchain that can compile your hardware design to bitstream. Has everything you need to start experimenting with FPGAs.
iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board Lattice iCE40-HX8K-CT256 7,680 $49 No 8 LEDs, 8 switches. Very similar to icoBoard, but no Raspberry Pi or pmod accessories.
iCE40 UltraPlus Lattice iCE40 UltraPlus FPGA 5280 $99 No Chip specs. 4 switchable FPGAs, and a rechargeable battery. Bluetooth module, LCD Display (240 x 240 RGB), RGB LED, microphones, audio output, compass, pressure, gyro, accelerometer.
Go Board Lattice ICE40 HX1K FPGA 1280 $65 No 4 LEDs, 4 buttons, Dual 7-Segment LED Display, VGA, 25 MHz on-board clock, 1 Mb Flash.
snickerdoodle Xilinx Zynq 7010 28K $95 Yes Xilinx Zynq 7-Series SoC - ARM Cortex-A9 processor, and Artix-7 FPGA. 125 IO pins. 1GB DDR2 RAM. Texas Instruments WiLink 8 wireless module for 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1. No LEDs or buttons, but easy to wire up your own on a breadboard. If you want to use a baseboard, you'll need a snickerdoodle black ($195) with the pins in the "down" orientation. (E.g. The "breakyBreaky breakout board" ($49) or piSmasher SBC ($195)). The snickerdoodle one only comes with pins in the "up" orientation and doesn't support any baseboards. But you can still plug the jumpers into the pins and wire up things on a breadboard.
numato Mimas A7 Xilinx Artix 7 52K $149 No 2Gb DDR3 RAM. Gigabit Ethernet. HDMI IN/OUT. 100MHz LVDS oscillator. 80 IOs. 7-segment display, LEDs, buttons. (Found in this Reddit thread.)
Ultra96 Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ ZU3EG 154K $249 Yes Has one of the latest Xilinx SoCs. 2 GB (512M x32) LPDDR4 Memory. Wi-Fi / Bluetooth. Mini DisplayPort. 1x USB 3.0 type Micro-B, 2x USB 3.0 Type A. Audio I/O. Four user-controllable LEDs. No buttons and limited LEDs, but easy to wire up your own on a breadboard
Nexys A7-100T Xilinx Artix 7 15,850 $265 No . 128MiB DDR2 RAM. Ethernet port, PWM audio output, accelerometer, PDM microphone, microphone, etc. 16 switches, 16 LEDs. 7 segment displays. USB HID Host for mice, keyboards and memory sticks.
Zybo Z7-10 Xilinx Zynq 7010 17,600 $199 Yes Xilinx Zynq 7000 SoC (ARM Cortex-A9, 7-series FPGA.) 1 GB DDR3 RAM. A few switches, push buttons, and LEDs. USB and Ethernet. Audio in/out ports. HDMI source + sink with CEC. 8 Total Processor I/O, 40 Total FPGA I/O. Also a faster version for $299 (Zybo Z7-20).
Arty A7 Xilinx Artix 7 15K $119 No 256MB DDR3L. 10/100 Mbps Ethernet. A few switches, buttons, LEDs.
DE10-Standard (specs) Altera Cyclone V 110K $350 Yes Dual-core Cortex-A9 processor. Lots of buttons, LEDs, and other peripherals.
DE10-Nano Altera Cyclone V 110K $130 Yes Same as DE10-Standard, but not as many peripherals, buttons, LEDs, etc.

Winner:

icoBoard ($100). (Buy it here.)
The icoBoard plugs into a Raspberry Pi, so it's similar to having a SoC. The iCE40-HX8K chip comes with 7,680 LUTs (logic elements.) This means that after you learn the basics and create some simple circuits, you'll also have enough logic elements to run the VexRiscv soft-core CPU (the lightweight Murax SoC.)
The icoBoard also supports a huge range of pluggable pmod accessories:
You can pick whatever peripherals you're interested in, and buy some more in the future.
Every FPGA vendor keeps their bitstream format secret. (Here's a Hacker News discussion about it.) The iCE40-HX8K bitstream has been fully reverse engineered by Project IceStorm, and there is an open-source set of tools that can compile Verilog to iCE40 bitstream.
This means that you have the freedom to do some crazy experiments, like:
You don't really have the same freedom to explore these things with Xilinx or Altera FPGAs. (Especially asynchronous circuits.)

Links:

Second Place:

iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board ($49)

Third Place:

numato Mimas A7 ($149).
An excellent development board with a Xilinx Artix 7 FPGA, so you can play with a bigger / faster FPGA and run a full RISC-V soft-core with all the options enabled, and a much higher clock speed. (The iCE40 FPGAs are a bit slow and small.)
Note: I've changed my mind several times as I learned new things. Here's some of my previous thoughts.

What did I buy?

I ordered a iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board to try out the IceStorm open source tooling. (I would have ordered an icoBoard if I had found it earlier.) I also bought a numato Mimas A7 so that I could experiment with the Artix 7 FPGA and Xilinx software (Vivado Design Suite.)

Questions

What can I do with an FPGA? / How many LUTs do I need?

submitted by ndbroadbent to FPGA [link] [comments]

FPGA Mining a threat to GPU mining?

How big of a threat is FPGA mining to GPU mining? Will FPGA mining make GPU mining obsolete the way CPU mining was made obsolete by GPU mining? How fast is this likely to happen? FPGAs seem to be expensive compared to 5970s, but more power efficient.
submitted by CentralAfricanWorker to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

what is Litecoin?

To know more about Litecoin check out tech355.
submitted by swapnil355 to litecoinforbeginners [link] [comments]

Anyone bullish on XLNX?

There's a pretty interesting debate in the AI space right now on whether FPGAs or ASICs are the way to go for hardware-accelerated AI in production. To summarize, it's more about how to operationalize AI - how to use already trained models with millions of parameters to get real-time predictions, like in video analysis or complex time series models based on deep neural networks. Training those AI models still seems to favor GPUs for now.
Google seem to be betting big on ASICs with their TPU. On the other hand, Microsoft and Amazon seem to favor FPGAs. In fact Microsoft have recently partnered with Xilinx to add FPGA co-processors on half of their servers (they were previously only using Intel's Altera).
The FPGA is the more flexible piece of hardware but it is less efficient than an ASIC, and have been notoriously hard to program against (though things are improving). There's also a nice article out there summarizing the classical FPGA conundrum: they're great for designing and prototyping but as soon as your architecture stabilizes and you're looking to ramp up production, taking the time to do an ASIC will more often be the better investment.
So the question (for me) is where AI inference will be in that regard. I'm sure Google's projects are large scale enough that an ASIC makes sense, but not everyone is Google. And there is so much research being done in the AI space right now and everyone's putting out so many promising new ideas that being more flexible might carry an advantage. Google have already put out three versions of their TPUs in the space of two years
Which brings me back to Xilinx. They have a promising platform for AI acceleration both in the datacenter and embedded devices which was launched two months ago. If it catches on it's gonna give them a nice boost for the next couple of years. If it doesn't, they still have traditional Industrial, Aerospace & Defense workloads to fall back on...
Another wrinkle is their SoCs are being used in crypto mining ASICs like Antminer, so you never know how that demand is gonna go. As the value of BTC continues to sink there is constant demand for more efficient mining hardware, and I do think cryptocurrencies are here to stay. While NVDA has fallen off a cliff recently due to excess GPU inventory, XLNX has kept steady.

XLNX TTM P/E is 28.98
Semiconductors - Programmable Logic industry's TTM P/E is 26.48

Thoughts?
submitted by neaorin to StockMarket [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: My name is Ryan Ackroyd and back in 2011 I was arrested for my part in the groups know as Lulz Security (LulzSec), Anonymous and Operation Anti Security (#AntiSec). I am LulzSec, AMA!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-04-03
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
What was it like being raided? GAME OVER PLEASE INSERT COINS.
Do you have any regrets about your involvement with those groups? Snowden, hero or villain? Why? There's no point regretting anything because you cannot undo the past. I heard about Snowden in prison, came on the news but I only know what the news has been telling me. I will look more in to it, he's got balls I can tell you that and I admire a good set of balls.
Really? Good set of balls? Are we not doing phrasing anymore? Yes really.
Any advice on learning how to program? I'm struggling with Python at the moment. You don't learn how to program, you learn how use a programming language, programming is what you do with that information. Read lots of examples of source code, see if you can work out whats going on. Don't just copy/paste the examples, write them word for word no matter how long they are. Not only will it help understand what it is doing better you may also learn a few tricks.
That's deep man. Thanks for the advice. No problem.
You don't learn how to program, you learn how use a programming language. Damn, pretty sweet quote there. It's also true.
How did you get started 'hacking'? I first started back in 1998 I mostly used to hack PC games, hex editing, binary reverse engineering stuff. Then I learned how to use C and assembly and it just went from there.
What do you recommend for someone that's interested in hacking(in terms of learning it)? Hacking is the art of reverse engineering, before you can reverse engineer something you need to have an in depth knowledge of it.
What are your thoughts on mass surveillance? Any advice for the masses? It's been going on longer than you or I have existed. Strong encryption is the key.
Ever considered a job with the NSA? GCHQ? I don't think I would pass the security clearance now anyways. I am x military though so who knows.
I am surprised you are allowed to use computers or the internet at all now considering some of the parole conditions of many American hackers. Can you talk about some of the restrictions in the SCPO and why you feel they are unfair? Basically it prevents me from using encryption that allows hidden volumes, virtual machines and I cannot delete my internet history. It lasts for 5 years and each breach of the order can be punishable up to 5 years.
It's not a case of them being fair or unfair. I can't go too in to detail about it if I want to take it back to court, I just want to challenge it, plus I like to keep my cards close to my chest.
So would say firefox's private browsing mode be against the rules? I don't think so, I'd have to check the src of firefox to determine if it deletes the history in private mode or if it simply does not record it in anyway. The order says "Not to delete".
So if you just image a fresh install of your variety of os(debian?) everyday would that break your parole? I could just boot live OS and not be in breach.
Is that what you do? I used to, remember slax?
Are you proud of the sacrifices you made in your lifetime? Yes I am, I never look back I just move forward in to the future hoping to find peace and happiness.
Did you meet anyone interesting in prison? There's some funny characters in prison I can tell you that, made friends for life. Most of the people in there were in there for fraud, drugs, gang stuff. I never met any famous prisoners if that's what you mean? Then again everyone's story in prison is interesting.
What is the best way to protect your digital identity, and secure your privacy? Since you have experience exploiting these vulnerabilities, what do you suggest to prevent it? Strong encryption, limit the amount of personal information you place on the internet, don't draw attention, only use a sandboxed browser and tunnel your HTTPS through SSH using the highest of encryption, PGP mail for every mail, don't store encryption keys on your computer, full disk encryption and/or hidden OS, use different emails for your banking, paypal etc, Mak3p4$5w0rdZ!nCr3d!b4LlYsTr0nG, uninstall flash use Link to youtube.com instead etc, etc...
Thanks for your answer. I am not worried about personal use, I am more worried about enterprise and or security systems. preventing people from hacking my companies website, and social media accounts. I have to keep in compliance with the financial standards, so we use PGP, and Erado, for archiving and encryption. It is just nice to get the perspective what is an easy target, what would you consider a difficult target not worth pursuing? I could write a book to answer this...
Security isn't something you can just apply it's an on going process and in most cases you are relying on products sold to you on a trust basis. You're told that Antivirus software will stop you getting a virus but what you're not told is that Antivirus software only protects you against what is known, takes less than an hour to write a new piece of malware or backdoor that your AV will never detect.
People put too much faith in to security systems without understanding how they work, their capabilities or limitations.
There's no need to be "pentested" it's a right con, they only test you against old exploits, if you update regular then you're already safe.
Use 2 factor authentication and/or strong password policy, prevent users creating the own password (they will only make them simpler)
Just make your data worthless to a hacker by encrypting it.
Insightful, thank you. I know it's a vague question, but you just confirmed my intuition. Thanks for your honest answers. No problem.
Was it worth going to prison? Nothing is worth going to prison for. Yeah they are happy I am back and I am happy to see them again. It was ~100GBP for my parents to come and visit me in prison, I was a long way from home. I told them not to waste their money because the visit only lasts 2 hours.
How is your family treating you, are they happy to have you back? Did they visit you in prison? I am x military I am used to being away from home for long periods of time. It also makes time fly faster when you're not constantly reminded about home. If you don't know what you are missing then you don't miss much.
I've never been to prison, but I lost about 8 years of my life due to bad medical advice. I used to be angry-- I was thinking why wasn't it only 2 years-- why did it have to be such a complete waste of so many years? Would that have happened if it had been only 2 years instead of 8? I don't think so. Sometimes, events like that helps to put things in to perspective. We often don't think about our lives on a day to day basis but when something out of the "norm" happens it makes us think that little more.
What do you think about bitcoin? where will it be in 10 years? I think it's great, scrypt coin too! I think they will get heavily regulated soon though. I had 78 bitcoins backed up on a SDHC before I was sent to prison. Back then they were worth ~$40 each. Come out of jail and I can't find that shit anywhere lol.
The only problem is even if I do find it, it's encrypted with keys that are on the computer the police confiscated and I can't get back.
I know right?
Sue them. They stole you $ 78k. It's killing me!
If they've not destroyed your computer or had a seize order against it then you can get back things like that. Ask your lawyer. They seized it in court, I can however apply "for a copy of evidence" under UK law and they would have to give me a copy of the HDD.
Do this. Those bitcoins won't last. How long untill they are orphaned? It's been ~3 years already.
No idea. I meant they won't last as a concept (especially not at that value). Wow, only just seen it but they peaked at ~$1000? Feels bad man.
Exactly - since then the Chinese and Russians have banned it, and you can only consider it's a downward spiral from there. I wonder how long it will last here in the west, I'm surprised it hasn't already been regulated the tax man must be pissed!
I think there are also more constructive uses for mining, I mentioned this on twitter also. See there are a lot of cancer researchers and scientists that have HUGE amounts of data that needs to be mined to help cure diseases and solve the worlds problems.
The world hash rate for crypto coins is more powerful than most of the worlds super computers combined. Cancer researchers should give coins for mining cancer research data instead of wasting time generating meaningless hashes.
Do you like sporks? Yes, I do, do you?
Hey man we are asking YOU the questions here. Leave the interrogations to us the professionals. Ok bro.
Ex Army eh? Signals? or Tech in REME? I was in the Infantry.
So how were you ID'd for arrest? I fucked up, I've already explained it on here, lurk moar.
Just curious, do you think big brother is reading this ama real time or at all? They will be on this like flies round shit.
Where does/did LulzSec congregate? What is the education background of a typical member, or from where did you learn to do what you can do? We had our own private IRCD and encrypted silc servers, also channels on public servers. I am completely self taught, I have been at it since 1998.
Isn't the true "lulzy" part of this that you guys bugged some people and mocked their security and then ended up getting busted and going to prison while the companies you annoyed made their security better? That's pretty lulzy to me. What I find lulzy is the fact they were all vulnerable to webapp vulnerabilites and don't use PGP.
Wasn't LulzSec responsible for the major Sony Online Entertainment security breach? I know you wanted to retaliate because SONY was suing George Holtz for the PS3 jailbreaking thing he did, but the only thing that happened is that you inconvenienced the people. Basically I am asking. Why did you ruin all those accounts, which lead to people having their credit cards stolen, instead of just attacking SONY directly. Also, how many accounts were compromised? LulzSec says 1000, SONY says ~4000. LulzSec had nothing to do with the PSN breach, fact.
Do you suspect who was responsible? (group name, not actual name) Honestly, no Idea there is too much internet rumor and no one has officially come forward to claim it. I read some people in Spain were arrested and questioned in relation to the PSN breach but that still doesn't mean it was them.
What are your political views? I don't really have any political views, however I would like to see the rest of the world get a chance to sample democracy and be free from oppressive dictatorships (no naming names).
At first welcome back. So here an total haxolulz/past unrelated question what kind of music do you like? I like Hard Dance music, Hard Trance/Hard House.
Fuck yeah! Trance and House all the way. I used to have a set of Technics 1210 Mk2 and mix like mad when I was younger, still got some of the vinyl haha.
Hackers soundtrack, orbitals by halicon. Not hard but one of my favorites. Thanks I'll check this out. The LuLzSec hacker song by ytcracker is the ONLY hacker song haha.Link to www.youtube.com
Who is your favorite Trance artist? Ever been to any festivals? Tidy boys, nothing but. Their events are awesome, youtube "Tidy weekender"
How came you guys got the cia down? It was hit with a 100,000 node botnet.
What does this mean in layman's terms? 100,000 computers were used to send ALOT of data to the server causing it crash.
That's as simple as it gets.
Any advice for aspiring hacktivists? Trust no one.
Still on 4chan? fav boards? Rules 1&2 always apply.
Hate to break it to you bro, but 4chan is just full of kids now. The rules of the internet have somewhat faded since you left the intertubes in 2011 :( consequences will never be the same again. Ebaums world has been dead a longtime because people broke 1&2
What's your opinion on the book by Parmy Olson? I think I recall she said she talked to you by chat, but how accurate was what eventually made it into the book? I lost the book before I could read it all so I don't know...
What do you think your job prospects are now with the conviction hanging over your head? Not too good! I'm on my arse at the minuet, I'll do any job!
Any job? ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) Allmost...
Write a book. Is it really needed?
Not needed per se. But you can tell an autobiographical perspective that nobody else can. The story lulz & Anon supporters would want to hear. Obviously not a 'tell all' but a 'tell most'? Yeah I get what you mean.
Was there a time before you were caught that you were worried or thought the authorities might have a clue as to your real identity? I knew I was going to get caught, I fucked up.
Did you have a backup plan? There was no backup plan but I realized the mistake early and acted accordingly! No I do not own guns, they're a lot more restricted here in the UK.
Are you still in touch with Jason? Saw he went to prison recently, I actually went to HS with him. How long did he get?
Jeremy, not Jason. Twins. Yeah, I think he got 10 years or something like that? I've not heard anything from him since I got out, hope he is ok.
I look up to you on how you managed to convince everyone you're a girl, smart and funny thing at the same time. Really I look up to you like a celebrity, hah. Maintaining a strong persona such as kayla and doing what I did wasn't easy. If I could go back in time I wouldn't change anything, I'd just keep going back in time to relive it over and over again. Nothing is worth prison time, it's a waste of life however I did manage to get some qualifications out of it. Not many people can say they left prison with a diploma for the thing they went in for.
If you could go back in time, before the creation of Lulzsec, what would you do differently? Also, was Lulzsec's missions worth the prison time? Where did you learn social engineering, and hacking? I learned to do what I do from programming, it is simply reverse engineering.
Thank you for your answer. What do you think about the Syrian Electronic Army, their methods of attacks, and their meaning? I honestly believe they are state sponsored (possibly not from the beginning) but I do believe they are the people Assad is turning to. As for their methods I don't even know what methods they are using, I'll read in to it though, I'm fresh out of prison and most of what they have done was done while I had no internet access. I've been banned from the internet since 2011.
That they are, got many of Advanced Replacements on products. If you had to choose between, Windows or OSX which would you choose. I'd choose Windows, I'm not a fan of OSX.
This is probably the longest I've ever seen someone take questions in an AMA. Thank you for dedicating so much time to answering people's questions. No problem I enjoy answering questions and I will be here until the questions dry up.
How did it feel being able to get behind a computer for a first time in 2+ years? Did you build a rig to re-live the novelty or do anything particularly special? Porn, me thinks. I was able to use computers in prison. I was given a job as a class room assistant helping teach people about computers, basic things. I also managed to complete a number of computer related qualifications and gained a diploma. Seeing the internet after 2+ years was kind of strange though. The internet looks a lot different now compared to how it did in 2011. To be honest I don't like it, it has that "iphone look" to it all, big buttons and lots of unneeded JS. I wish I could build a rig I just do not have the money to do so. Hopefully soon I will find a nice job and maybe then I will build one.
Did you have internet in jail? No they do not allow internet in UK prisons.
Do you think access to the internet should be a human right? When will it be? Yes it should be and I am sure it is already so!
Here you go Link to www.wired.co.uk
My question: Did you ever have any suspicions about Sabu? At any point did you guys think, Something is up with this dude? Everyone had suspicions about everyone, things were being patched, rootkits disappearing, logs being leaked etc..
Was prison anything like you had expected it to be? Better than I thought it would be, I had most prison movies flashing in my head on the way there from court but it's nothing like that.
Could you elaborate more on what it's like please? Once I got to prison I realized it's nothing like the movies. Because it was all over the news when I was sentenced everyone in the jail knew who I was and what I was in for. I've made some good friends out it, people I am going to meet again once they are free. No one was ever violent towards me, you don't give any attitude you don't get any attitude. I did see some people get fucked up in there, mostly starts over something really silly, like a game of pool.
How did you pass the time? I used to pass the time playing chess with my cell mate or by watching all crazy people in there.
Did you personally encounter much violence in the prison? Or is it easy enough to stay away from it if you don't rock the boat or whatever? Well, most of the prison movies I have seen all show people stood at the bars, big guys growling "mmm fresh meat" and everyone getting stabbed up every 2 minuets. When you've never been to prison before you can't help but think back to every movie you've seen about prison.
When do you think the govt will evolve enough to have guys like you helping to grow our society? Right now it seeks to hunt you down...terrible waste of resources imo It is, there's a lot of talent rotting away in the prison system.
Administrations that in one breath expresses the need for engineers of digital space and then issues the order to capture the very people with such talents. Edit: its been many administrations haha :*( And many more to come!
Its wishful thinking but i hope that the economic imperative will win out as we progress to what can be depicted best by the Type I civilization coined by popular theoretical physicist Michio Kaku. Things need to change, that's for sure.
Is Milhouse a meme? Milhouse was the best meme!!
Do you like Wheatus? No, Wheatus sucks.
How do they ? Well I just like to suck wheats thats all.
What do you think - in Wrestlemania '98, did Mike Tyson get punched in the cock? Never watched it back then, I hope so!
Are you now like Gavin Orsay (Jimmi Simpson) on House of Cards? Never watched it, only just got out of prison I've heard a lot about that series, I'll look in to it.
Gavin in House of Cards has a guinea pig. Reminded me of "Noodles". :3. Hahaha.
the character Gavin is this hacker and there's a scene where he tells his FBI handler that they have to drop charges against Barrett Brown. Link to www.youtube.com Really?
Indeed. And check out who advised on the new season of HoC :3. Link to www.theguardian.com. HAHAHAHAHA.
Do they let you have PlayStation in British prisons? Link to www.dailymail.co.uk. They do if you buy the PlayStation.
What did you have in your cell? TV, Kettle, Radio, Bed, locker and that's it... I wasn't bothered about a play station, just used to play a lot of chess and poker.
What sort of people did you meet in association with the hacking groups? What kind of people are hackers? Out of everyone I have met there are only a small handful of people that I would put in to the "reverse engineehacker" bracket. Lots of people who know how to use exploits, not many who know how and why they work or are able to write their own, truly is a dieing art.
Do you ever think about trying to get hired for security for websites or for government computers or something along those lines? Again it's probably a trust issue...
Personally, I was very stupid and didn't really care about the ease with which personal information can spread, and didn't know how widespread NSA surveillance was. Given that a lot of stuff is out there already, if someone wanted to take the time to look at it, do you have any advice as to how to minimize the damage? Strong encryption is the key but to be honest, Internet Service Providers should be doing more to protect it's customers privacy, they should allow AES256 pipes for every customer as standard.
Many (fairly intelligent) people I talk to agree that they are concerned about surveillance and privacy on the internet, but they're resistant to try and use encryption or anything because they have it in their heads that only supergeniuses can understand computers like that. Do you have any suggestions for introducing these concepts to slightly technophobic people? I think encryption needs to be simplified for the regular user. It can get a bit confusing if you have never used it before or understand it's significance.
Also, wanted to thank you for your advice to the person below asking about how to learn programming. I know a little introductory Python, but I never really knew how to go from there to creating and understanding a whole big project. Programming languages too, learning new things is never easy, it's about determination and the will to succeed. The best way to learn is to read lots of source code and try to work out what is going on, maybe you could even improve on it?
How did you learn to hack? From learning to program.
Hacking is reverse engineering, it's an in depth knowledge of the underlying system/code/hardware/technology and the ability to take it apart piece by piece and reassemble it in to something else.
How long did it take you to become a proficient programmer? How did you learn? How long did it take you to become a proficient reverse engineer? How did you learn? I just learned from doing, trial and error. If there was something that I did not understand I would just research it, it sometimes helps to read it from more than one source. I used to just read lots of examples and try to make sense of them, if I found something new or something I did not understand I would research it.
As for time, I am unsure... I am still learning now, it is an on going process. All I can say is learn the basics and be creative, if there's something you do not understand research it, google always has the answer.
Have you only just got out of prison? I have been out a few weeks but I have only been on the internet a few days now.
Ever hear from anyone in that channel? Just one, those times are sadly gone.
When you got V&, they said two men where arrested for using the Kayla alias in some media. What happened there? The other person was my brother, they were unsure if it was him or me.
Ahh, You're poor brother... what happened when you got raided, how many people, where did they take you? I was home alone, they arrested me and took me to the police station for questioning. They told me during questioning that they had also been to arrest my brother.
Is human body very good build pc with very cheap soft?If it's so easy to exploit:( No it's a design prone to failure.
I want to learn Python 3. Codecademy is Python 2 (like all good tutorials...they seem to be for 2). Thanks for the links. I'll look into them. At the minuet I am going over logic, reading into some Verilog and other HDL because I want to experiment with some Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA).
Hey its Kayla! Hahaha.
Hey thanks for the advice in the thread . I'll definitely use that on my quest to getting my Computer science thread and furthering my programming language knowledge ! No problem.
Kayla, I just want to say thank you. Haha no problem.
Meanwhile, while you were in prison our gov't set up a fake twitter type service in Cuba with the intent of helping topple the Cuban gov't. -_- I'd like to see how you have come to this conclusion? Or is it official and that is it's official purpose?
I just find it ironic that while prosecuting with one hand the other is going to extreme lengths to topple a government with social media. It's usually the case.
You should try this at /netsec. Possibly, no way to link them over? I'll admit it, this is the first time I've ever used or been to reddit.
They would probably have a few more knowledgeable comments and questions. Doesn't seem like any of them took the bait!
Yea, go to /netsec and create a new post, and make it a link (to the url of this thread). Make the title basically the same, but bring up the fact that it's an xpost. Thanks, I'll do this after I've made a coffee!
My question: why didn't you guys get ahead of the game by targeting Google. They're the resident evil today. Care to explain?
I think he meant Umbrella Corp. They have their hands in everything, and are mercilessly expanding. Fist umbrella fuck with zombies, now google!
#tr0ll. Hahaha, I'd like to believe it but...
Last updated: 2014-04-07 22:43 UTC
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KNCminer to release 350 GH/s in September

Everyone,
A lot has happened in the last few weeks, so we thought it was time for a new update. The main focus of this newsletter will be around the following topics:
Jupiter’s performance increase. A new product called Saturn. More information on our approach to Litecoin mining devices. Things we are working on in the next few weeks. Update of Jupiter performance https://www.kncminer.com/products/jupiter We have previously announced that Jupiter will have a minimum performance of 250GH/s. We can now be a little more accurate and say that it will be above 350GH/s. A few improvements have allowed this to happen. One of them is that we are now able to use the 28nm technology in our standard ASIC design.
Delivery is also important to our customers so we can also narrow down from saying autumn to the latter part of September 2013. This is still a compressed timeline but we are very confident we can meet our deadline. (Which in terms of Standard cell ASIC design is a very aggressive time frame.) We are able to commit to this deadline because of the experience that ORSoC brings.
The last update around Jupiter is the price. We previously stated that it would be between 7000 and 8000 USD per device. The final component costs are all in and we can confirm that the price will be 6995 USD.
So to recap. Jupiter now comes with:
350 GH/s. 28nm Standard Cell ASIC chips. Shipment in September 2013. 6995 USD price tag. Announcement of Saturn https://www.kncminer.com/products/saturn We have had many people asking for a cheaper ASIC device, which would still give great value for money in terms of hashes per dollar.
So we have listened. We have created Saturn, Saturn is a 4 blade device. (Jupiter is an 8 blade device) Saturn still offers great value in terms of hash per dollar, but has a much more favorable purchase price of 3795 USD. It will have a minimum performance of 175 GH/s and because it’s based on the same modular design as Jupiter, they will ship alongside each other in September 2013.
So to recap on Saturn:
175 GH/s. 28nm Standard Cell ASIC chips. Shipment in September 2013. 3795 USD price tag.
Litecoin device A common request arriving on our desks is around us producing a Litecoin mining device. We have stated that we are looking into it, to see if we can develop a device that would make sense for the Litecoin community. What we would like to say at this stage is that we are removing things form our plate which in any way delay the shipment of our ASIC based Bitcoin mining hardware, having said that if we have any space in our resources. (Which we may increase in the near future) They are being targeted at producing a Litecoin device. So as of today it’s on the plan but is second only to the ASIC Bitcoin devices. We will continue to conduct research into Litecoin devices and see exactly how challenging it would be to produce an FPGA type setup for mining Litecoins.
The coming weeks Next week we will have a demo video of our Mars device uploaded for everyone to see. So at this point we would like to invite the community to select people to come to our offices. Those people would be able to meet the engineering team and have a look at our prototype. If you would like an invite please send us an email. We will try to accommodate as many people as we can.
Above all we would like to say thanks again for all of your feedback. Keep it coming it allows us to produce better and more targeted products.
KnCMiner Team
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12 Reasons to Invest in Primecoin

‎1- Primecoin‬ is the First non Hash-Cash PoW Crypto-Currency.
2- Naturally Scarce
3- Very fast confirmations - 1min/block
4- Elastic supply
5- Primecoin is sustainable
6- Primecoin is currently the “fairest” coin to mine
7- Primecoin can introduce new participants to the new digital economy
8- Proof-of-work cryptos will gradually transition toward energy-multiuse, ie providing both security & technological computing values. And Primecoin is the pioneer in this realm.
9- Primecoin has anti-centralization features
10- Primecoin captures the Wasted Energy of Bitcoin's Algorithm - The mining is actually useful
11- Primecoin has direct by-products
12- Primecoin has been developed by Sunny King, one of the most talented crypto-technologists of the rank of Satoshi Nakamoto
submitted by crypto_coiner to primecoin [link] [comments]

KNCMiner open for preorder

Hi everyone, it’s time for another newsletter from us. Today we will cover: Online video demo of Mars The future of Mars More specifications of Jupiter and Saturn Our little lottery giveaway Order book opening
Online video demo of Mars We made a promise to you all not to take any payment of any device until we could show you a working prototype, well today it’s finally here. Our developers have been working almost round the clock to get this box hashing as fast as possible, we said Mars would hash at 6 GH/s and in the video you can see exactly how fast we managed to make it go. The Mars prototype is as the name suggests, a prototype. As you can see it doesn’t even have a case yet. The performance of our device is, and always will be, more important to us than the look. We know it won’t win any design awards but we are engineering for speed first and foremost. Please have a look at the video which can be found here. http://youtu.be/foeBUcagT2s 100%
The Future of Mars Even with the new improvements of the Mars device it still has a few issues. It’s not anywhere near as efficient as Jupiter or Saturn in terms of $’s per Hash and it will really only mine Bitcoins. To sum up, we don’t think with the difficulty increasing at the current rate it’s good value for money and if it’s not good for you it’s not good for us. We will let our competitors sell devices with this kind of speed so we can concentrate on the ground breaking devices. We know a lot of people have ordered the device simply to gain a queue placement for Jupiter and quite a few people have asked us not to send them the device but to charge them and just allow them to use the queue placement. So given all of the above we have decided that we will remove Mars in its current form from sale. That leaves a few questions I’m sure. So let me try to alleviate your worries, anyone who has a registration for the Mars device will be able to use that queue placement for either a Jupiter or a Saturn, simply order one of those in the our shop with the same email address you registered your Mars device against and we will do the rest. Then there are the people who wanted the Mars device to mine other types of coins, what we will do is produce a new device based on the Mars type setup (with a case). It will be announced fully in the next few months but I can tell a few things today. We will target this new device against all the currencies we can. Not just litecoin, namecoin etc but also many others. The new FPGA based device will then have a much longer life expectancy and produce a much better ROI than Mars ever could. We will also be making updates available to the firmware if and when new types of coins come out. Removing Mars from sale will also free up some of our internal resources enabling them to work on Jupiter and Saturn and hopefully bring the delivery of those devices forward.
Order books now open for payment
The order books are now open for the first time allowing full ordering and payment of the Jupiter and Saturn devices. Everyone already has their place in the queue so we are giving everyone 7 days to pay and maintain that place. If there are any technical issues with our website or payment portals over the next 7 days we will of course increase this period accordingly. Once the 7 days are over we will provide everyone with their final shipping queue placement. We are able to ship hundreds of devices a week using the agreements we have in place with the factories so we still expect to be able to serve the vast majority of customers in September. Unlike others in this industry we will not be doing the assembly in house it will be done at the same professional assembly lines which ORSoC have been using for years. visit www.kncminer.com for more info
Our little lottery giveaway
for those of you who are able to pay in the first 48 hours starting from now. we will enter your email address into a lottery. After 48 hours we will randomly select three queue numbers, the first name chosen will get a free Jupiter and Saturn, the second will get a free Jupiter and the third will get a free Saturn. We will then contact you and ask if we can make your name and country/state public on our site. We will add the devices to your account and ship them free of charge to you along with your order.
Hosting
We will also be offering tailored hosting of our own devices. Hosting packages offered will be specially made for each hosting customer. Please contact us at [email protected] for more information about hosting. Some benefits of hosting:
No costs for shipping/import taxes All costs included no hidden extra management fees Your hardware will be monitored 24/7 by our staff Your box will hash for you on day one 95% uptime guarantee For those of you interested in hosting please choose Stockholm pickup as the shipping method We will release final costs soon and if you want to use our hosting that’s fine, if you want to then have the box shipped you can simply pay for the shipping and we will ship your box instead. What’s next? What we will do over the next few weeks is provide more news on our Website/Facebook page and our Twitter feed. We will send out regular newsletters and keep the news section of our site up to date with all development.
If you have any questions or comments feel free to email us at [email protected]
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22 Million Dollars Mined EVERY DAY in Cryptocurrency  How To Earn Passive Income Mining Crypto! ASIC miner for sale 2019 BITCOIN mining hardware Best GPU's for Mining!  ProgPow  Ethereum  RVN KawPow ... Bitcoin Mining Hardware - CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs and ASICs Lancelot FPGA Bitcoin Miner Unboxing

FPGA or Field Programmable Gate Array is an integrated circuit that can be configured and customized for Bitcoin mining. This allows miners to buy these chips in bulk and customize them for their operations. These provide a better hash rate than GPUs. ASIC or Application Specific Integrated Circuits are the most powerful mining hardware ... The third main innovation to bitcoin mining probably required the most important measure of devoted sources, time and improvement to attain. Rather than repurposing the computer software program and {hardware} parameters of present machines, efforts to create a altogether new machine that may exclusively mine bitcoin last paid off. BTCMiner is an Open Source Bitcoin Miner for ZTEX USB-FPGA modules 1.5. ... An Airbnb For Bitcoin Mining. Former Microsoft Engineer Helps Raise $8 Million to Fund Giga Watt Project, an Airbnb for Bitcoin Mining Cynthia Turcotte June 15, 2017 5:00 pm Giga Watt Token Launch has raised $8 million to democratize access to the Washington state-based ... FPGA Bitcoin Mining. At the foundation of block creation and mining is the calculation of this digital signature. Different cryptocurrencies use different approaches to generate the signature. For the most popular cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, the signature is calculated using a cryptographic hashing function. FPGA FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) mining is Bitcoin mining development was the introduction. It is built with microcircuit designed to be configured . It is built with microcircuit ...

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22 Million Dollars Mined EVERY DAY in Cryptocurrency How To Earn Passive Income Mining Crypto!

50+ videos Play all Mix - Bitcoin Mining Hardware - CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs and ASICs YouTube Tips for Small Bitcoin Miners to Maximize Their Advantages - Duration: 26:55. Block Operations 93,508 views Generally speaking, there are 4 types of mining hardware ASIC, FPGA, CPU, and GPU miners, and we focused on the main 3 for this video which are ASIC miners, GPU mining rigs, and using your CPU to ... In this video I take a look at Bitcoin mining hardware. I compare the performance and power usage between BFL SC ASIC vs FPGA vs GPU (Nvideo GTX 560 Ti and AMD ATI Radeon HD 8950) vs CPU (Intel ... The machine still does work perfectly except is blocked from mining from ASIC miner co. This machine hardware is functionally, turns on and works. perfect to reverse engineer Great project to turn ... Lancelot FPGA Bitcoin Miner Unboxing Feel free to donate to keep more Tutorials coming: BTC:1Bv4XhVRZyNfBWuyFbqS8HwYwB3STJXdQA LTC:LWmXeH9Ur2xEbfoS8eiQJSxnra...

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