Buy Bitcoin with Credit Card Bitcoin.com

Nano is for Dummies**

Just kidding.
However, I don't think NANO has a chance in hell to replace Bitcoin which is what many of the Nano moonboys shill ALL the time across Reddit (y'all are relentless and some delusional).
I think the narrative really needs to be more around how NANO can be symbiotic with BTC (as opposed to replacing).
If we think of how, let's compare the two with a traditional Savings Account and a Spending Account. - Savings Account = BTC - Spending Account = NANO You don't ever want to carry a checkbook with you to the store and have a lengthy process for each and every transaction, it's totally inefficient (much like paying for things with BTC). Yet is has the strongest network and security so you want to keep the majority of your liquid wealth stored there (i.e ledger). To solve for this, you have a spending account so you can efficiently transact with convenience (i.e. credit/debit cards, Square, Pasmo/Suica in Japan, Apple/Google Pay, etc).
Nano has the right tech and a probable opportunity to be the best 'Spending Account' for the cryptocurrency ecosystem. Imagine there's a Nano prepaid debit card that can process transactions in milliseconds (Nano/USD real time price trading) doing real-time payments using existing tech like credit card readers or QR codes. Each card has its own wallet and in order to use it, it only requires that Nano is prepaid to its wallet.
Securing a spot in the BTC ecosystem should be a time-sensitive objective. BTC is King along with the top alts that will each serve a specific, unique and necessary use case.
@Nano Team (if you actually read this) - I remain optimistic about NANO and thank you creators ("go build something") for working tirelessly on this amazing tech! You guys rock. It would be great to hear more about Nano's overall Go-to-market plans and retail strategy though. If you don't have anything too robist yet, you might want to consider hiring a strategy and operations executive - I truly think this can be helpful.
submitted by hodlingon to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

Searching for the Unicorn Cryptocurrency

Searching for the Unicorn Cryptocurrency
For someone first starting out as a cryptocurrency investor, finding a trustworthy manual for screening a cryptocurrency’s merits is nonexistent as we are still in the early, Wild West days of the cryptocurrency market. One would need to become deeply familiar with the inner workings of blockchain to be able to perform the bare minimum due diligence.
One might believe, over time, that finding the perfect cryptocurrency may be nothing short of futile. If a cryptocurrency purports infinite scalability, then it is probably either lightweight with limited features or it is highly centralized among a limited number of nodes that perform consensus services especially Proof of Stake or Delegated Proof of Stake. Similarly, a cryptocurrency that purports comprehensive privacy may have technical obstacles to overcome if it aims to expand its applications such as in smart contracts. The bottom line is that it is extremely difficult for a cryptocurrency to have all important features jam-packed into itself.
The cryptocurrency space is stuck in the era of the “dial-up internet” in a manner of speaking. Currently blockchain can’t scale – not without certain tradeoffs – and it hasn’t fully resolved certain intractable issues such as user-unfriendly long addresses and how the blockchain size is forever increasing to name two.
In other words, we haven’t found the ultimate cryptocurrency. That is, we haven’t found the mystical unicorn cryptocurrency that ushers the era of decentralization while eschewing all the limitations of traditional blockchain systems.
“But wait – what about Ethereum once it implements sharding?”
“Wouldn’t IOTA be able to scale infinitely with smart contracts through its Qubic offering?”
“Isn’t Dash capable of having privacy, smart contracts, and instantaneous transactions?”
Those thoughts and comments may come from cryptocurrency investors who have done their research. It is natural for the informed investors to invest in projects that are believed to bring cutting edge technological transformation to blockchain. Sooner or later, the sinking realization will hit that any variation of the current blockchain technology will always likely have certain limitations.
Let us pretend that there indeed exists a unicorn cryptocurrency somewhere that may or may not be here yet. What would it look like, exactly? Let us set the 5 criteria of the unicorn cryptocurrency:
Unicorn Criteria
(1) Perfectly solves the blockchain trilemma:
o Infinite scalability
o Full security
o Full decentralization
(2) Zero or minimal transaction fee
(3) Full privacy
(4) Full smart contract capabilities
(5) Fair distribution and fair governance
For each of the above 5 criteria, there would not be any middle ground. For example, a cryptocurrency with just an in-protocol mixer would not be considered as having full privacy. As another example, an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) may possibly violate criterion (5) since with an ICO the distribution and governance are often heavily favored towards an oligarchy – this in turn would defy the spirit of decentralization that Bitcoin was found on.
There is no cryptocurrency currently that fits the above profile of the unicorn cryptocurrency. Let us examine an arbitrary list of highly hyped cryptocurrencies that meet the above list at least partially. The following list is by no means comprehensive but may be a sufficient sampling of various blockchain implementations:
Bitcoin (BTC)
Bitcoin is the very first and the best known cryptocurrency that started it all. While Bitcoin is generally considered extremely secure, it suffers from mining centralization to a degree. Bitcoin is not anonymous, lacks smart contracts, and most worrisomely, can only do about 7 transactions per seconds (TPS). Bitcoin is not the unicorn notwithstanding all the Bitcoin maximalists.
Ethereum (ETH)
Ethereum is widely considered the gold standard of smart contracts aside from its scalability problem. Sharding as part of Casper’s release is generally considered to be the solution to Ethereum’s scalability problem.
The goal of sharding is to split up validating responsibilities among various groups or shards. Ethereum’s sharding comes down to duplicating the existing blockchain architecture and sharing a token. This does not solve the core issue and simply kicks the can further down the road. After all, full nodes still need to exist one way or another.
Ethereum’s blockchain size problem is also an issue as will be explained more later in this article.
As a result, Ethereum is not the unicorn due to its incomplete approach to scalability and, to a degree, security.
Dash
Dash’s masternodes are widely considered to be centralized due to their high funding requirements, and there are accounts of a pre-mine in the beginning. Dash is not the unicorn due to its questionable decentralization.
Nano
Nano boasts rightfully for its instant, free transactions. But it lacks smart contracts and privacy, and it may be exposed to well orchestrated DDOS attacks. Therefore, it goes without saying that Nano is not the unicorn.
EOS
While EOS claims to execute millions of transactions per seconds, a quick glance reveals centralized parameters with 21 nodes and a questionable governance system. Therefore, EOS fails to achieve the unicorn status.
Monero (XMR)
One of the best known and respected privacy coins, Monero lacks smart contracts and may fall short of infinite scalability due to CryptoNote’s design. The unicorn rank is out of Monero’s reach.
IOTA
IOTA’s scalability is based on the number of transactions the network processes, and so its supposedly infinite scalability would fluctuate and is subject to the whims of the underlying transactions. While IOTA’s scalability approach is innovative and may work in the long term, it should be reminded that the unicorn cryptocurrency has no middle ground. The unicorn cryptocurrency would be expected to scale infinitely on a consistent basis from the beginning.
In addition, IOTA’s Masked Authenticated Messaging (MAM) feature does not bring privacy to the masses in a highly convenient manner. Consequently, the unicorn is not found with IOTA.

PascalCoin as a Candidate for the Unicorn Cryptocurrency
Please allow me to present a candidate for the cryptocurrency unicorn: PascalCoin.
According to the website, PascalCoin claims the following:
“PascalCoin is an instant, zero-fee, infinitely scalable, and decentralized cryptocurrency with advanced privacy and smart contract capabilities. Enabled by the SafeBox technology to become the world’s first blockchain independent of historical operations, PascalCoin possesses unlimited potential.”
The above summary is a mouthful to be sure, but let’s take a deep dive on how PascalCoin innovates with the SafeBox and more. Before we do this, I encourage you to first become acquainted with PascalCoin by watching the following video introduction:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=F25UU-0W9Dk
The rest of this section will be split into 10 parts in order to illustrate most of the notable features of PascalCoin. Naturally, let’s start off with the SafeBox.
Part #1: The SafeBox
Unlike traditional UTXO-based cryptocurrencies in which the blockchain records the specifics of each transaction (address, sender address, amount of funds transferred, etc.), the blockchain in PascalCoin is only used to mutate the SafeBox. The SafeBox is a separate but equivalent cryptographic data structure that snapshots account balances. PascalCoin’s blockchain is comparable to a machine that feeds the most important data – namely, the state of an account – into the SafeBox. Any node can still independently compute and verify the cumulative Proof-of-Work required to construct the SafeBox.
The PascalCoin whitepaper elegantly highlights the unique historical independence that the SafeBox possesses:
“While there are approaches that cryptocurrencies could use such as pruning, warp-sync, "finality checkpoints", UTXO-snapshotting, etc, there is a fundamental difference with PascalCoin. Their new nodes can only prove they are on most-work-chain using the infinite history whereas in PascalCoin, new nodes can prove they are on the most-work chain without the infinite history.”
Some cryptocurrency old-timers might instinctively balk at the idea of full nodes eschewing the entire history for security, but such a reaction would showcase a lack of understanding on what the SafeBox really does.
A concrete example would go a long way to best illustrate what the SafeBox does. Let’s say I input the following operations in my calculator:
5 * 5 – 10 / 2 + 5
It does not take a genius to calculate the answer, 25. Now, the expression “5 \ 5 – 10 / 2 + 5”* would be forever imbued on a traditional blockchain’s history. But the SafeBox begs to differ. It says that the expression “5 \ 5 – 10 / 2 + 5”* should instead be simply “25” so as preserve simplicity, time, and space. In other words, the SafeBox simply preserves the account balance.
But some might still be unsatisfied and claim that if one cannot trace the series of operations (transactions) that lead to the final number (balance) of 25, the blockchain is inherently insecure.
Here are four important security aspects of the SafeBox that some people fail to realize:
(1) SafeBox Follows the Longest Chain of Proof-of-Work
The SafeBox mutates itself per 100 blocks. Each new SafeBox mutation must reference both to the previous SafeBox mutation and the preceding 100 blocks in order to be valid, and the resultant hash of the new mutated SafeBox must then be referenced by each of the new subsequent blocks, and the process repeats itself forever.
The fact that each new SafeBox mutation must reference to the previous SafeBox mutation is comparable to relying on the entire history. This is because the previous SafeBox mutation encapsulates the result of cumulative entire history except for the 100 blocks which is why each new SafeBox mutation requires both the previous SafeBox mutation and the preceding 100 blocks.
So in a sense, there is a single interconnected chain of inflows and outflows, supported by Byzantine Proof-of-Work consensus, instead of the entire history of transactions.
More concretely, the SafeBox follows the path of the longest chain of Proof-of-Work simply by design, and is thus cryptographically equivalent to the entire history even without tracing specific operations in the past. If the chain is rolled back with a 51% attack, only the attacker’s own account(s) in the SafeBox can be manipulated as is explained in the next part.
(2) A 51% Attack on PascalCoin Functions the Same as Others
A 51% attack on PascalCoin would work in a similar way as with other Proof-of-Work cryptocurrencies. An attacker cannot modify a transaction in the past without affecting the current SafeBox hash which is accepted by all honest nodes.
Someone might claim that if you roll back all the current blocks plus the 100 blocks prior to the SafeBox’s mutation, one could create a forged SafeBox with different balances for all accounts. This would be incorrect as one would be able to manipulate only his or her own account(s) in the SafeBox with a 51% attack – just as is the case with other UTXO cryptocurrencies. The SafeBox stores the balances of all accounts which are in turn irreversibly linked only to their respective owners’ private keys.
(3) One Could Preserve the Entire History of the PascalCoin Blockchain
No blockchain data in PascalCoin is ever deleted even in the presence of the SafeBox. Since the SafeBox is cryptographically equivalent to a full node with the entire history as explained above, PascalCoin full nodes are not expected to contain infinite history. But for whatever reason(s) one may have, one could still keep all the PascalCoin blockchain history as well along with the SafeBox as an option even though it would be redundant.
Without storing the entire history of the PascalCoin blockchain, you can still trace the specific operations of the 100 blocks prior to when the SafeBox absorbs and reflects the net result (a single balance for each account) from those 100 blocks. But if you’re interested in tracing operations over a longer period in the past – as redundant as that may be – you’d have the option to do so by storing the entire history of the PascalCoin blockchain.
(4) The SafeBox is Equivalent to the Entire Blockchain History
Some skeptics may ask this question: “What if the SafeBox is forever lost? How would you be able to verify your accounts?” Asking this question is tantamount to asking to what would happen to Bitcoin if all of its entire history was erased. The result would be chaos, of course, but the SafeBox is still in line with the general security model of a traditional blockchain with respect to black swans.
Now that we know the security of the SafeBox is not compromised, what are the implications of this new blockchain paradigm? A colorful illustration as follows still wouldn’t do justice to the subtle revolution that the SafeBox ushers. The automobiles we see on the street are the cookie-and-butter representation of traditional blockchain systems. The SafeBox, on the other hand, supercharges those traditional cars to become the Transformers from Michael Bay’s films.
The SafeBox is an entirely different blockchain architecture that is impressive in its simplicity and ingenuity. The SafeBox’s design is only the opening act for PascalCoin’s vast nuclear arsenal. If the above was all that PascalCoin offers, it still wouldn’t come close to achieving the unicorn status but luckily, we have just scratched the surface. Please keep on reading on if you want to learn how PascalCoin is going to shatter the cryptocurrency industry into pieces. Buckle down as this is going to be a long read as we explore further about the SafeBox’s implications.
Part #2: 0-Confirmation Transactions
To begin, 0-confirmation transactions are secure in PascalCoin thanks to the SafeBox.
The following paraphrases an explanation of PascalCoin’s 0-confirmations from the whitepaper:
“Since PascalCoin is not a UTXO-based currency but rather a State-based currency thanks to the SafeBox, the security guarantee of 0-confirmation transactions are much stronger than in UTXO-based currencies. For example, in Bitcoin if a merchant accepts a 0-confirmation transaction for a coffee, the buyer can simply roll that transaction back after receiving the coffee but before the transaction is confirmed in a block. The way the buyer does this is by re-spending those UTXOs to himself in a new transaction (with a higher fee) thus invalidating them for the merchant. In PascalCoin, this is virtually impossible since the buyer's transaction to the merchant is simply a delta-operation to debit/credit a quantity from/to accounts respectively. The buyer is unable to erase or pre-empt this two-sided, debit/credit-based transaction from the network’s pending pool until it either enters a block for confirmation or is discarded with respect to both sender and receiver ends. If the buyer tries to double-spend the coffee funds after receiving the coffee but before they clear, the double-spend transaction will not propagate the network since nodes cannot propagate a double-spending transaction thanks to the debit/credit nature of the transaction. A UTXO-based transaction is initially one-sided before confirmation and therefore is more exposed to one-sided malicious schemes of double spending.”
Phew, that explanation was technical but it had to be done. In summary, PascalCoin possesses the only secure 0-confirmation transactions in the cryptocurrency industry, and it goes without saying that this means PascalCoin is extremely fast. In fact, PascalCoin is capable of 72,000 TPS even prior to any additional extensive optimizations down the road. In other words, PascalCoin is as instant as it gets and gives Nano a run for its money.
Part #3: Zero Fee
Let’s circle back to our discussion of PascalCoin’s 0-confirmation capability. Here’s a little fun magical twist to PascalCoin’s 0-confirmation magic: 0-confirmation transactions are zero-fee. As in you don’t pay a single cent in fee for each 0-confirmation! There is just a tiny downside: if you create a second transaction in a 5-minute block window then you’d need to pay a minimal fee. Imagine using Nano but with a significantly stronger anti-DDOS protection for spam! But there shouldn’t be any complaint as this fee would amount to 0.0001 Pascal or $0.00002 based on the current price of a Pascal at the time of this writing.
So, how come the fee for blazingly fast transactions is nonexistent? This is where the magic of the SafeBox arises in three ways:
(1) PascalCoin possesses the secure 0-confirmation feature as discussed above that enables this speed.
(2) There is no fee bidding competition of transaction priority typical in UTXO cryptocurrencies since, once again, PascalCoin operates on secure 0-confirmations.
(3) There is no fee incentive needed to run full nodes on behalf of the network’s security beyond the consensus rewards.
Part #4: Blockchain Size
Let’s expand more on the third point above, using Ethereum as an example. Since Ethereum’s launch in 2015, its full blockchain size is currently around 2 TB, give or take, but let’s just say its blockchain size is 100 GB for now to avoid offending the Ethereum elitists who insist there are different types of full nodes that are lighter. Whoever runs Ethereum’s full nodes would expect storage fees on top of the typical consensus fees as it takes significant resources to shoulder Ethereum’s full blockchain size and in turn secure the network. What if I told you that PascalCoin’s full blockchain size will never exceed few GBs after thousands of years? That is just what the SafeBox enables PascalCoin to do so. It is estimated that by 2072, PascalCoin’s full nodes will only be 6 GB which is low enough not to warrant any fee incentives for hosting full nodes. Remember, the SafeBox is an ultra-light cryptographic data structure that is cryptographically equivalent to a blockchain with the entire transaction history. In other words, the SafeBox is a compact spreadsheet of all account balances that functions as PascalCoin’s full node!
Not only does the SafeBox’s infinitesimal memory size helps to reduce transaction fees by phasing out any storage fees, but it also paves the way for true decentralization. It would be trivial for every PascalCoin user to opt a full node in the form of a wallet. This is extreme decentralization at its finest since the majority of users of other cryptocurrencies ditch full nodes due to their burdensome sizes. It is naïve to believe that storage costs would reduce enough to the point where hosting full nodes are trivial. Take a look at the following chart outlining the trend of storage cost.

* https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-cost-per-gigabyte/
As we can see, storage costs continue to decrease but the descent is slowing down as is the norm with technological improvements. In the meantime, blockchain sizes of other cryptocurrencies are increasing linearly or, in the case of smart contract engines like Ethereum, parabolically. Imagine a cryptocurrency smart contract engine like Ethereum garnering worldwide adoption; how do you think Ethereum’s size would look like in the far future based on the following chart?


https://i.redd.it/k57nimdjmo621.png

Ethereum’s future blockchain size is not looking pretty in terms of sustainable security. Sharding is not a fix for this issue since there still needs to be full nodes but that is a different topic for another time.
It is astonishing that the cryptocurrency community as a whole has passively accepted this forever-expanding-blockchain-size problem as an inescapable fate.
PascalCoin is the only cryptocurrency that has fully escaped the death vortex of forever expanding blockchain size. Its blockchain size wouldn’t exceed 10 GB even after many hundreds of years of worldwide adoption. Ethereum’s blockchain size after hundreds of years of worldwide adoption would make fine comedy.
Part #5: Simple, Short, and Ordinal Addresses
Remember how the SafeBox works by snapshotting all account balances? As it turns out, the account address system is almost as cool as the SafeBox itself.
Imagine yourself in this situation: on a very hot and sunny day, you’re wandering down the street across from your house and ran into a lemonade stand – the old-fashioned kind without any QR code or credit card terminal. The kid across you is selling a lemonade cup for 1 Pascal with a poster outlining the payment address as 5471-55. You flip out your phone and click “Send” with 1 Pascal to the address 5471-55; viola, exactly one second later you’re drinking your lemonade without paying a cent for the transaction fee!
The last thing one wants to do is to figure out how to copy/paste to, say, the following address 1BoatSLRHtKNngkdXEeobR76b53LETtpyT on the spot wouldn’t it? Gone are the obnoxiously long addresses that plague all cryptocurrencies. The days of those unreadable addresses will be long gone – it has to be if blockchain is to innovate itself for the general public. EOS has a similar feature for readable addresses but in a very limited manner in comparison, and nicknames attached to addresses in GUIs don’t count since blockchain-wide compatibility wouldn’t hold.
Not only does PascalCoin has the neat feature of having addresses (called PASAs) that amount to up to 6 or 7 digits, but PascalCoin can also incorporate in-protocol address naming as opposed to GUI address nicknames. Suppose I want to order something from Amazon using Pascal; I simply search the word “Amazon” then the corresponding account number shows up. Pretty neat, right?
The astute reader may gather that PascalCoin’s address system makes it necessary to commoditize addresses, and he/she would be correct. Some view this as a weakness; part #10 later in this segment addresses this incorrect perception.
Part #6: Privacy
As if the above wasn’t enough, here’s another secret that PascalCoin has: it is a full-blown privacy coin. It uses two separate foundations to achieve comprehensive anonymity: in-protocol mixer for transfer amounts and zn-SNARKs for private balances. The former has been implemented and the latter is on the roadmap. Both the 0-confirmation transaction and the negligible transaction fee would make PascalCoin the most scalable privacy coin of any other cryptocurrencies pending the zk-SNARKs implementation.
Part #7: Smart Contracts
Next, PascalCoin will take smart contracts to the next level with a layer-2 overlay consensus system that pioneers sidechains and other smart contract implementations.
In formal terms, this layer-2 architecture will facilitate the transfer of data between PASAs which in turn allows clean enveloping of layer-2 protocols inside layer-1 much in the same way that HTTP lives inside TCP.
To summarize:
· The layer-2 consensus method is separate from the layer-1 Proof-of-Work. This layer-2 consensus method is independent and flexible. A sidechain – based on a single encompassing PASA – could apply Proof-of-Stake (POS), Delegated Proof-of-Stake (DPOS), or Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) as the consensus system of its choice.
· Such a layer-2 smart contract platform can be written in any languages.
· Layer-2 sidechains will also provide very strong anonymity since funds are all pooled and keys are not used to unlock them.
· This layer-2 architecture is ingenious in which the computation is separate from layer-2 consensus, in effect removing any bottleneck.
· Horizontal scaling exists in this paradigm as there is no interdependence between smart contracts and states are not managed by slow sidechains.
· Speed and scalability are fully independent of PascalCoin.
One would be able to run the entire global financial system on PascalCoin’s infinitely scalable smart contract platform and it would still scale infinitely. In fact, this layer-2 architecture would be exponentially faster than Ethereum even after its sharding is implemented.
All this is the main focus of PascalCoin’s upcoming version 5 in 2019. A whitepaper add-on for this major upgrade will be released in early 2019.
Part #8: RandomHash Algorithm
Surely there must be some tradeoffs to PascalCoin’s impressive capabilities, you might be asking yourself. One might bring up the fact that PascalCoin’s layer-1 is based on Proof-of-Work and is thus susceptible to mining centralization. This would be a fallacy as PascalCoin has pioneered the very first true ASIC, GPU, and dual-mining resistant algorithm known as RandomHash that obliterates anything that is not CPU based and gives all the power back to solo miners.
Here is the official description of RandomHash:
“RandomHash is a high-level cryptographic hash algorithm that combines other well-known hash primitives in a highly serial manner. The distinguishing feature is that calculations for a nonce are dependent on partial calculations of other nonces, selected at random. This allows a serial hasher (CPU) to re-use these partial calculations in subsequent mining saving 50% or more of the work-load. Parallel hashers (GPU) cannot benefit from this optimization since the optimal nonce-set cannot be pre-calculated as it is determined on-the-fly. As a result, parallel hashers (GPU) are required to perform the full workload for every nonce. Also, the algorithm results in 10x memory bloat for a parallel implementation. In addition to its serial nature, it is branch-heavy and recursive making in optimal for CPU-only mining.”
One might be understandably skeptical of any Proof-of-Work algorithm that solves ASIC and GPU centralization once for all because there have been countless proposals being thrown around for various algorithms since the dawn of Bitcoin. Is RandomHash truly the ASIC & GPU killer that it claims to be?
Herman Schoenfeld, the inventor behind RandomHash, described his algorithm in the following:
“RandomHash offers endless ASIC-design breaking surface due to its use of recursion, hash algo selection, memory hardness and random number generation.
For example, changing how round hash selection is made and/or random number generator algo and/or checksum algo and/or their sequencing will totally break an ASIC design. Conceptually if you can significantly change the structure of the output assembly whilst keeping the high-level algorithm as invariant as possible, the ASIC design will necessarily require proportional restructuring. This results from the fact that ASIC designs mirror the ASM of the algorithm rather than the algorithm itself.”
Polyminer1 (pseudonym), one of the members of the PascalCoin core team who developed RHMiner (official software for mining RandomHash), claimed as follows:
“The design of RandomHash is, to my experience, a genuine innovation. I’ve been 30 years in the field. I’ve rarely been surprised by anything. RandomHash was one of my rare surprises. It’s elegant, simple, and achieves resistance in all fronts.”
PascalCoin may have been the first party to achieve the race of what could possibly be described as the “God algorithm” for Proof-of-Work cryptocurrencies. Look no further than one of Monero’s core developers since 2015, Howard Chu. In September 2018, Howard declared that he has found a solution, called RandomJS, to permanently keep ASICs off the network without repetitive algorithm changes. This solution actually closely mirrors RandomHash’s algorithm. Discussing about his algorithm, Howard asserted that “RandomJS is coming at the problem from a direction that nobody else is.”
Link to Howard Chu’s article on RandomJS:
https://www.coindesk.com/one-musicians-creative-solution-to-drive-asics-off-monero
Yet when Herman was asked about Howard’s approach, he responded:
“Yes, looks like it may work although using Javascript was a bit much. They should’ve just used an assembly subset and generated random ASM programs. In a way, RandomHash does this with its repeated use of random mem-transforms during expansion phase.”
In the end, PascalCoin may have successfully implemented the most revolutionary Proof-of-Work algorithm, one that eclipses Howard’s burgeoning vision, to date that almost nobody knows about. To learn more about RandomHash, refer to the following resources:
RandomHash whitepaper:
https://www.pascalcoin.org/storage/whitepapers/RandomHash_Whitepaper.pdf
Technical proposal for RandomHash:
https://github.com/PascalCoin/PascalCoin/blob/mastePIP/PIP-0009.md
Someone might claim that PascalCoin still suffers from mining centralization after RandomHash, and this is somewhat misleading as will be explained in part #10.
Part #9: Fair Distribution and Governance
Not only does PascalCoin rest on superior technology, but it also has its roots in the correct philosophy of decentralized distribution and governance. There was no ICO or pre-mine, and the developer fund exists as a percentage of mining rewards as voted by the community. This developer fund is 100% governed by a decentralized autonomous organization – currently facilitated by the PascalCoin Foundation – that will eventually be transformed into an autonomous smart contract platform. Not only is the developer fund voted upon by the community, but PascalCoin’s development roadmap is also voted upon the community via the Protocol Improvement Proposals (PIPs).
This decentralized governance also serves an important benefit as a powerful deterrent to unseemly fork wars that befall many cryptocurrencies.
Part #10: Common Misconceptions of PascalCoin
“The branding is terrible”
PascalCoin is currently working very hard on its image and is preparing for several branding and marketing initiatives in the short term. For example, two of the core developers of the PascalCoin recently interviewed with the Fox Business Network. A YouTube replay of this interview will be heavily promoted.
Some people object to the name PascalCoin. First, it’s worth noting that PascalCoin is the name of the project while Pascal is the name of the underlying currency. Secondly, Google and YouTube received excessive criticisms back then in the beginning with their name choices. Look at where those companies are nowadays – surely a somewhat similar situation faces PascalCoin until the name’s familiarity percolates into the public.
“The wallet GUI is terrible”
As the team is run by a small yet extremely dedicated developers, multiple priorities can be challenging to juggle. The lack of funding through an ICO or a pre-mine also makes it challenging to accelerate development. The top priority of the core developers is to continue developing full-time on the groundbreaking technology that PascalCoin offers. In the meantime, an updated and user-friendly wallet GUI has been worked upon for some time and will be released in due time. Rome wasn’t built in one day.
“One would need to purchase a PASA in the first place”
This is a complicated topic since PASAs need to be commoditized by the SafeBox’s design, meaning that PASAs cannot be obtained at no charge to prevent systematic abuse. This raises two seemingly valid concerns:
· As a chicken and egg problem, how would one purchase a PASA using Pascal in the first place if one cannot obtain Pascal without a PASA?
· How would the price of PASAs stay low and affordable in the face of significant demand?
With regards to the chicken and egg problem, there are many ways – some finished and some unfinished – to obtain your first PASA as explained on the “Get Started” page on the PascalCoin website:
https://www.pascalcoin.org/get_started
More importantly, however, is the fact that there are few methods that can get your first PASA for free. The team will also release another method soon in which you could obtain your first PASA for free via a single SMS message. This would probably become by far the simplest and the easiest way to obtain your first PASA for free. There will be more new ways to easily obtain your first PASA for free down the road.
What about ensuring the PASA market at large remains inexpensive and affordable following your first (and probably free) PASA acquisition? This would be achieved in two ways:
· Decentralized governance of the PASA economics per the explanation in the FAQ section on the bottom of the PascalCoin website (https://www.pascalcoin.org/)
· Unlimited and free pseudo-PASAs based on layer-2 in the next version release.
“PascalCoin is still centralized after the release of RandomHash”
Did the implementation of RandomHash from version 4 live up to its promise?
The official goals of RandomHash were as follow:
(1) Implement a GPU & ASIC resistant hash algorithm
(2) Eliminate dual mining
The two goals above were achieved by every possible measure.
Yet a mining pool, Nanopool, was able to regain its hash majority after a significant but a temporary dip.
The official conclusion is that, from a probabilistic viewpoint, solo miners are more profitable than pool miners. However, pool mining is enticing for solo miners who 1) have limited hardware as it ensures a steady income instead of highly profitable but probabilistic income via solo mining, and 2) who prefer convenient software and/or GUI.
What is the next step, then? While the barrier of entry for solo miners has successfully been put down, additional work needs to be done. The PascalCoin team and the community are earnestly investigating additional steps to improve mining decentralization with respect to pool mining specifically to add on top of RandomHash’s successful elimination of GPU, ASIC, and dual-mining dominance.
It is likely that the PascalCoin community will promote the following two initiatives in the near future:
(1) Establish a community-driven, nonprofit mining pool with attractive incentives.
(2) Optimize RHMiner, PascalCoin’s official solo mining software, for performance upgrades.
A single pool dominance is likely short lived once more options emerge for individual CPU miners who want to avoid solo mining for whatever reason(s).
Let us use Bitcoin as an example. Bitcoin mining is dominated by ASICs and mining pools but no single pool is – at the time of this writing – even close on obtaining the hash majority. With CPU solo mining being a feasible option in conjunction with ASIC and GPU mining eradication with RandomHash, the future hash rate distribution of PascalCoin would be far more promising than Bitcoin’s hash rate distribution.
PascalCoin is the Unicorn Cryptocurrency
If you’ve read this far, let’s cut straight to the point: PascalCoin IS the unicorn cryptocurrency.
It is worth noting that PascalCoin is still a young cryptocurrency as it was launched at the end of 2016. This means that many features are still work in progress such as zn-SNARKs, smart contracts, and pool decentralization to name few. However, it appears that all of the unicorn criteria are within PascalCoin’s reach once PascalCoin’s technical roadmap is mostly completed.
Based on this expository on PascalCoin’s technology, there is every reason to believe that PascalCoin is the unicorn cryptocurrency. PascalCoin also solves two fundamental blockchain problems beyond the unicorn criteria that were previously considered unsolvable: blockchain size and simple address system. The SafeBox pushes PascalCoin to the forefront of cryptocurrency zeitgeist since it is a superior solution compared to UTXO, Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), Block Lattice, Tangle, and any other blockchain innovations.


THE UNICORN

Author: Tyler Swob
submitted by Kosass to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

SLT - intro

ABSTRACT The experience of buying and selling cryptocurrencies is as much of a barrier to the expansion of cryptocurrency trading as the relative novelty of the entire concept. While it is no doubt a more recognised and even well regarded market activity, with organisations such as the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) recently offering the world’s first official cryptocurrency futures contract, and several exchanges opening almost every other week, it is still very much a niche market position to engage in substantial buying and selling of cryptocurrencies. When compared with the market volumes for trading fiat or other stores of value like precious metals, the total cryptocurrency market capitalization of $471,511,748,724 is little more than pocket change. To put it in perspective, the total market capitalization of Bitcoin, which is by far the world’s most popular cryptocurrency is $166 billion, less than the $171 billion market cap of MasterCard, which is not even a fiat issuer. Clearly, despite the leaps and bounds that have been recorded in the growing success story of trading cryptocurrency on the open market, a substantial amount of work still remains to be done. Many reasons exist for the persistence of a gap in market adoption and participation, but perhaps one of the most ubiquitous and detrimental is the sheer difficulty of actually participating in the cryptocurrency market trading space. Due to a lack of regulation stemming from the decentralized nature of tokens, the market is crammed with a vast number of competing platforms and exchanges, all claiming to do certain things which many of them glaringly fail at. For example, the sheer amount of operational friction involved in carrying out a simple purchase transaction is enough to put off many first-time investors and market participants, especially those who do not understand the cryptocurrency ecosystem in detail and those who are used to the structure and order in a regular stock market. The speed of transactions on many platforms has often gained notoriety for creating severely dissatisfied users who had to wait for hours, days or even weeks for a single transaction to trundle its way through. In the midst of these delays, the dynamic market keeps changing. sometimes literally minute-by-minute, which severely compromises the investment position of the user and makes them unlikely to return as market participants again. Some users have even found out to their great personal cost, that while cryptocurrency tokens themselves cannot be hacked or duplicated, they can be stolen from digital wallets that do not have adequate security. So when executing cryptocurrency trades, it has been known to happen that the trading platforms or exchanges used suffered a severe security breach, sometimes with hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of user cryptocurrency being stolen. Amidst the unique crypto trading environment of unmatched optimism mixed with real risks and horror stories, the challenge is to create a solution that offers all users quick, easy and secure access into the cryptocurrency marketplace with zero fuss and very low risk. This solution would need to cater to both veteran participants in the ecosystem and new entrants into the market, giving both an equal chance to compete. The security on this platform would substantially preclude the possibility of a devastating failure that would compromise user assets and disrupt the user experience. Taking all these problems, challenges and needs into consideration, SLT has been developed as a trading platform offering users the power to buy and sell digital tokens to each other. Making full ue of the security and data processing advantages offered by the Blockchain, SLT proposes to revolutionize the experience of market participation in cryptocurrency trading by making it easily accessible to all types, classes and grades of users, safe and free of potential security failure points, and with a wide scope of application and uses within the ecosystem. The team behind SLT has several years of online work experience, and what unites all of them is a shared experience of the same operational problems present in terms of investing in the cryptocurrency market. SLT is the result of years of thought and research into how to adequately solve the problems once and for all and even create extra value for market participants into the bargain.
INTRODUCTION Before going further in the paper, there are a few terms and concepts that need to be properly defined before the reader can fully appreciate the ideas and solutions that will be proposed later on. The first of these terms is blockchain. A blockchain, according to the standard definition is a network that is decentralized and distributed across all its nodes so that the network cannot be compromised by any single node. In plain English, what that means is that a chain of little bits of data called ‘blocks’ being created, updated and stored across several different locations in real-time is called a ‘blockchain’. The major difference between blockchain networks and regular centralized networks is that unlike the latter, blockchains do not have a “server” or a “headquarters” where isolated information exists in a silo. Blockchains rather use the entire network of nodes as their storage and processing capacity, and each node has a copy of the blockchain which is constantly in communication with the others, verifying transactions and comparing information to make sure the data across all of them is exactly the same. If any single node has data that does not match with that on the rest of the blockchain network, it is immediately isolated as a compromised node and the network automatically excludes it and keeps on functioning. What this means to the uninitiated is that blockchains are very secure, possessing no single location that can be hacked or compromised in any way, and not permitting any variation in data across network nodes. Data stored on a blockchain is thus practically immutable and unchangeable, which make it ideal for recording sensitive data like transaction records and medical records. The second term to be examined is fiat currency. A fiat currency is basically the money most people are used to, which is in either cash or electronic form. The distinguishing features of every fiat currency are that they always have a central issuer – usually a government or a central banking institution – and their use and relative value is constantly managed by these issuers. Unlike blockchain-based solutions, they are all built on centralized rather than distributed infrastructure, which makes them a constant target for hackers and fraudsters. They also contain identifying information unlike digital tokens. A third term that needs to be explored is cryptocurrency. A cryptocurrency is a representation of a digital asset, and it is also sometimes referred to as a token or a coin. Cryptocurrencies contain no information that can be used to personally identify their users, and as such they have gained popularity around the world for a variety of reasons as ‘anonymous currency’. In places like Zimbabwe, Venezuela and Greece for example, in response to crippling capital controls imposed by the government which severely limited the amount of money allowed to be taken out of the country, a huge number of people turned to Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies as an undetectable means of transferring their wealth abroad. A vast number of cryptocurrencies exist currently, ranging from the ubiquitous Bitcoin (BTC) and Ethereum (ETH) to a basket of currencies including Ripple (XRP), Litecoin (LTC), Dash (DASH), Monero (XMR), Lisk (LSK), TRON (TRX), ICON (ICX), Stratis (STRAT), Zcash (ZEC), Nano (XRB), Steem (STEEM), Bytecoin (BCN), and Populous (PPT), amongst others. For the purposes of this paper, the cryptocurrency that will be focused on is SLT, which is the native currency of the SLT platform. Another concept that needs to be defined is the smart contract. A smart contract is a method of exchanging value between two or more parties using the blockchain as a tool for validation and escrow. Using a smart contract, a seller and a buyer involved in a peer-to-peer transaction do not need to have a middleman interceding between them to ensure that the right exchange is made at the right time. Rather, a set of conditions, instructions and parameters is coded into the blockchain, and the buyer deposits their cryptocurrency into a safe wallet under the care of the smart contract protocol. Once the buyer confirms that they have received the requested value from the seller and it is acceptable to them, the smart contract automatically releases the payment to the seller. Doing business by smart contract is an idea that started off as a novelty and is rapidly taking off, as it removes the burden of validation from both parties involved in a transaction and saves them the cost of a human middleman or bank charges involved in actual escrow transactions. Most smart contracts nowadays are built on the Ethereum blockchain, which is especially optimised to aid peer-to-peer transactions. The final term that will be defined is cryptocurrency exchange. Also often referred to as “exchanges”, these are institutions that enable users to exchange cryptocurrencies for other cryptocurrencies and fiat currencies. In effect, they serve as intermediaries between cryptocurrency buyers and sellers, connecting demand with supply and enabling buyers to make their desired purchases using cryptos or fiats of their choice, according to which ones are supported by the individual exchange. In the world of buying and selling cryptocurrencies, exchanges are the engines of the industry, in a similar way to how banks are the drivers of offline economies. The level of speed and security offered by a cryptocurrency exchange is often the difference between a profitable transaction and an unqualified loss. In a market as dynamic as cryptocurrency trading, delays of even a few minutes can have dramatic results, as big hitters like Bitcoin have been known to lose as much as 50% of their value in just a few hours. In order for cryptocurrency trading to be able to go truly mainstream, it is imperative that an exchange solution will be created that enables users and investors to move seamlessly through the market and execute transactions instantaneously, as is obtainable in fiat currency markets.
PROBLEM STATEMENT Presently, cryptocurrency trading is not suffering from a lack of interest, but there is a considerable infrastructural barrier to entry into the market. The available platforms generally cannot deal with the sheer volume of transactions and the required speed of processing transactions, causing many existing and potential investors to become frustrated and lose interest in the market. The three major problems facing the cryptocurrency buying and selling space can be itemized and broken down as follows: - Lack of speed: In the space of a few minutes, it is not unheard of for cryptocurrencies to gain as much as 30% on the market. As with any other type of dynamic market trading activity, the ability to predict and react to quick-fire changes is key to the profitability of the trading operation. When market participants are not able to get their purchase and selling orders processed in a manner that matches the dynamism of the marketplace they operate in, this usually results in losses and a resultant loss of appetite for involvement in that market space. - Security breaches: Trading platforms and cryptocurrency exchanges have been the targets of sustained and regular attacks from hackers, fraudsters and a number of other undesirable elements. In a few high profile cases, they have actually been successful, eventually making away with hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of client cryptocurrency funds and leaving both platform and customer financially wrecked. A few customers who have managed to get past the buying and selling process with no incident have had the misfortune of using exchanges without adequate cybersecurity measures in place, and this has led to their cryptocurrency wallets being hacked, and millions of dollars’ worth of anonymous, untraceable coins being stolen. These stories also receive a substantial amount of media airplay, which feeds into an existing narrative of cryptocurrency being some sort of scam, and this further alienates potential investors and participants. - Transaction fees: Several platforms have delivered unpleasant surprises to their users in the form of excessive transaction fees. Perhaps as a result of the lack of volume resulting from their poor trading infrastructure and bad liquidity position, a number of cryptocurrency trading platforms try to make up for the revenue lost to poor transaction volumes by charging high transaction fees. In essence, the idea is that instead of fixing the problems leading to slow transactions and the resultant low transaction volumes, users would simply be charged more to make up for the revenue shortfall. This means that investors lose both ways, both to the low speed transaction execution and poor security offered by most existing cryptocurrency trading platforms, and high transaction fees for the few trades that do manage to go through. SLT FRAMEWORK Using these problems as an existential barometer, SLT has created a trading platform that is focused on the needs of its users before anyone else. The platform focuses on revolutionizing transaction speeds and achieving instantaneous execution by making use of blockchain processing instead of centralized processing. This solution will also exponentially improve upon the existing security profiles of competing platforms because it is practically impossible to hack a blockchain. Use of the SLT token will also eventually reduce transaction fee and speed up transactions using blockchain technology. Platform Goals The overall aim of SLT is to create a fast, simple, safe and clearly defined platform that everyone can understand without hidden intentions and costs. The platform also aims to emulate the very operational logic of the blockchain in its operations by catering to a decentralized market. Instead of appealing to only a fraction of the available global market, SLT will allow anyone to have access to the platform, and it ensure that equal chances are given to all members to earn. The final aim of SLT is to be able to deliver on the promise of instant payments and withdrawals using blockchain technology. Future Expansion Plans The launch of the SLT token is a part of a strategy that will be instituted to reduce transaction fees for users and eventually to speed up transactions. A key part of this strategy is the opening of the SLT cryptocurrency exchange. Combining these two solutions, it is the hope that users who currently face problems with opening different wallets and with withdrawing money they earn can find a quick and easy resolution to these issues. The platform will have a wallet exchanger and a digital asset exchanger in one place for the first time, giving users as much flexibility as they need to access and convert their money rapidly so as to be able to keep up with the dynamics and vagaries of the cryptocurrency trading market. Eventually, it is expected that users will even have the opportunity to make payments and withdraw money using the SLT Card, which will be integrated with major existing fiat providers to give maximum flexibility across crypto and fiat channels to SLT platform users. Pre ICO – 1 million 1st Round - 1 million 2nd Round - 3 million Price in Pre ICO= 0.10$ Price in 1.round =0.30$ Price in 2.round =0.50$ Action Plan Adding SLT on other exchanges Digital asset Exchanger ( multi-cryptocurrency exchange) Listing on CoinMarketCap Wallet exchanger Debit Card and adding other cards that will allow buying and withdrawals Mobile app available for iOS and Android Referral bonuses in ICO period: 5% 5% Bonus from each purchase made from your referral
Roadmap December 2017 Completion of platform conceptualization and ideation processes, followed by the commencement of preliminary development, design and integration work. March 2018 Pre-ICO begins: At this stage, investors will be able to buy SLT tokens at a special price of $0.10, which gives them a first-mover advantage over later investors during the ICO. ICO commences: The ICO will hold in two stages, giving investors the opportunity to purchase SLT tokens at $0.30 and $0.50 respectively, following a price-rise caused by the pre-ICO demand. March 2018 ICO ends: Investors will no longer be able to purchase SLT tokens directly from the ICO platform, but the tokens may be available from third party platforms like cryptocurrency exchanges. 2018 (all-year) Development and integration of Digital asset Exchanger ( multi-cryptocurrency exchange) and Wallet exchanger, develop breakthrough blockchain technologies Launch of mobile app for iOS and Android 2019 The full SLT platform will be launched offering the complete range of proposed functionalities after a year of development and integration. Later that year, the SLT card will also be launched, giving users extra flexibility across various fiat and cryptocurrency exchange mediums.
CONCLUSION SLT is the long-awaited platform that will permanently change how casual users and seasoned investment veterans interact with the cryptocurrency trading market. The important ways in which SLT will revolutionize the cryptocurrency trading space are as follows: The platform will severely cut down on time lost due to transaction delays and slow execution Making use of the multifunctionality of a wallet exchanger and a digital asset exchanger in the same place, the SLT platform will exponentially increase the speed with which users may access their funds and convert them into the desired format of their choice SLT will make use of blockchain technology to substantially increase the speed of transaction processing. Currently, many competing platforms make use of silo processing, which is heavily limited by available physical infrastructure. SLT embraces the blockchain at an elemental level, applying the principle of group processing to free up what has hitherto been an operational bottleneck. The use of blockchain technology as the basis of the platform will increase its security profile and make it an exceptionally difficult target for hackers, thieves and fraudsters. The SLT token will provide an quick and easy platform for cryptocurrency trading for users who do not want to deal with the delays involved in opening and accessing different wallets. Users of SLT tokens will experience substantially reduced transaction fees in addition to enhanced transaction speed Eventually, the launch of the SLT Card will take the concept beyond the point that the entire industry is at right now. This card will be used both as a means of paying in and withdrawing money from the platform, and its activation with a major real-world fiat provider will give users a totally unprecedented level of inter-connectedness between cryptocurrency coins and fiat.
DISCLAIMERS The SLT service and the SLT platform are provided strictly on an “as available” and "as is" basis. No assurances or representations of any type, direct or otherwise, are made regarding the operation of the service or the content, information, materials, or products displayed on the website. No express or implied representations or warranties regarding the SLT service and website, or the products or services provided therein are made. Therefore, any implied warranties of SLT merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement are expressly disclaimed and excluded. In addition, we make no representation that the operation of our service will be uninterrupted or error free, and we will not be liable for the consequences of any interruptions or errors be they direct, secondary, related, penal, or consequential. SLT, its officers, representatives, employees, managers, and salespersons, shall not in any way hold any liability for any loss/damages (direct or indirect) rising out of or in connection with your use of or your inability to use the SLT service and website, even if we have been duly advised of the possibility of such damages. SLT is not an investment. There is no guarantee that the SLT you purchase will increase in value and/or provide any return. SLT does not confer exclusive ownership or arbitrary right to control. Possession of SLT tokens does not grant the holder exclusive ownership or sole equity in the SLT platform as a whole. No one individual has exclusive rights or power over the SLT platform. The purchaser’s SLT can only be accessed with login credentials selected by the purchaser. The loss of these credentials will result in the loss of SLT. To prevent such a situation, it is strongly recommended that the holder should safely store credentials in one or more backup locations that are geographically separated from the working location, and are accessible in the event of an emergency. As they grow in popularity and application, Blockchain technologies have also become subject to regulatory attention and action by government and financial industry organisations around the world. The functioning of the SLT platform and SLT tokens could thus be impacted by any regulatory inquiries or actions, including but not limited to restrictions on the use or possession of digital tokens like SLT, which could impede or limit the development of the SLT platform. Following the token sale and the development of the initial version of the SLT platform, it is possible that blockchain-based platforms could be established, which operate using same open source code and open source protocol underlying the SLT platform. The SLT platform may have to compete with these alternative platforms, which could potentially negatively impact the performance of the SLT platform and SLT. It is possible that the SLT platform will not be used by large numbers of individuals, and that there will be limited public interest in the creation and development of distributed applications. Such a lack of interest could impact the development of the SLT platform and therefore the potential uses or value of SLT. The SLT platform is presently under development and may undergo significant changes before its full release. Any expectations regarding the form and functionality of SLT or the SLT platform held by the purchaser may not be met upon release, for any number of reasons including a change in the design and implementation plans and execution of the SLT platform. Hackers or other groups or organizations may attempt to interfere with the SLT platform or the availability of SLT in any number of ways, including without limitation denial of service attacks, Sybil attacks, spoofing, smurfing, malware attacks, or consensus-based attacks. The SLT platform consists of software that is based on open-source software. There is a risk that the SLT team, or other third parties may intentionally or unintentionally introduce weaknesses or bugs into the core infrastructural elements of the SLT platform, interfering with the use of or causing the loss of SLT and/or SLT. Advances in cryptography, or technical advances such as the development of quantum computers, could present risks to crypto currencies and the SLT platform, which could result in the theft or loss of SLT and/or SLT. While SLT should not be viewed as an investment, it may return value over time. That value may be limited if the SLT platform lacks use and adoption. If this becomes the case, there may be few or no profits to draw from, or even a loss of your initial investment. It is possible that the SLT platform malfunctions in an unfavorable way, including but not limited to one that results in the loss of information or data. Crypto-currency is a relatively new and untested technology. In addition to the risks set forth here, there are risks that the SLT team cannot anticipate. Risks may further materialize as unanticipated combinations or variations of the risks set forth here.
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Which Bitcoin Debit Cards Work Today  Crypto Corner #49 How to load Bitcoin on to your virtual card Android only Bitcoin ATM. Bitcoin Debit Card Crypto Card Suite Manager My Bitpay Visa Card Arrived!

Ledger Nano S Review and Comparison. By: Ofir Beigel Last updated: 6/1/20 I finally got my hands on a Ledger Nano S and decided to write this review which I have postponed for too long. In this post, I’ll cover a bit about hardware wallets in general and I’ll go in-depth into the Nano S’s features and competition. Buy Bitcoin online with your credit card or debit card. Buy Bitcoin Cash (BCH), Bitcoin (BTC) and other cryptocurrencies instantly. Our guides makes it easy! Buy Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies easily. Buy and invest in minutes using your credit card, bank transfer or Apple Pay. I want to buy. Bitcoin. BTC. The Bitcoin.com Wallet allows you to safely store and spend your Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash, along with other crypto assets. Already have a wallet? Buy Bitcoin instantly. Buy both Bitcoin Cash (BCH) and Bitcoin (BTC) now using a credit or debit card. I want to buy. Bitcoin. BTC. I want to spend. ... This post will guide you through everything about how to buy your first BTC. Along the line, i will also reveal places to buy bitcoin with usd safely with maybe, your debit or credit card.. Before we start with how to buy bitcoin, i will like you to know one thing in particular about the whole process. A 2-way Bitcoin ATM (buy and sell) packed with additional features such as a bill validator, barcode scanner, EMV card reader, fingerprint reader (optional) and a thermal printer. The Gensis1 costs $14,500. Satoshi1. The Satoshi1 comes in both a 1-way or 2-way model.

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Which Bitcoin Debit Cards Work Today Crypto Corner #49

Bitcoin Debit Card - E-Card: https://www.e-coin.io Our members love how simple our E-card is. We know you're busy, whether you are shopping online or around town. So, our E-card makes your life ... bitcoin debit card bitcoin wallet review bitcoin wallet cold storage bitcoin wallet address. Category ... Ledger Nano S Tutorial : Setup and Guide (Hardware wallet) - Duration: 11:39. The list of debit cards that are currently working and those that are in the making. Updated - October 2018 Links: 📌Wirex: https://bit.ly/2IZ84Q2 📌Revolut: h... 8.01x - Lect 24 - Rolling Motion, Gyroscopes, VERY NON-INTUITIVE - Duration: 49:13. Lectures by Walter Lewin. They will make you ♥ Physics. Recommended for you We do not store any identifying information about you, nor do we maintain a record of where/to whom debit cards have been sent. As Bitcoin enthusiasts, we are also privacy buffs! (oh, and ...

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